From “Aw” to “Ugh”

A few weeks ago, a video went viral after a woman posted herself going out of her way to do a good deed. In this video, the “star,” who was an Uber driver, went out and bought her female client some clothes, after learning of her passenger’s need for clothes before dropping her off that morning at her fast-food job. The driver even delivered them to her right there in the drive-through, and she did all of this while running her phone’s camera. My initial reaction to this video was, “Aw, that’s so sweet,” but my feelings whip-lashed before I knew what was happening. My thoughts went from “Aw!” to “Ugh!” in a matter of seconds. And here’s why: I started thinking about the logistics of this scenario, about exactly what transpired in order for this woman to have her good deed recorded.

If we’re going to be the kind of people who sit and watch life happen on tiny screens in front of our faces, the least we can do is actually *think* about what we’re watching, and this video had me thinking about how desperate we can often be for acknowledgement and/or attention. Take this “videographer” if you will. Here is a lady who had a very, very kind and generous idea to provide her client with something the client was unable to provide for herself. Nothing wrong with helping a person in need! That’s taking a page out of Jesus’s own book for crying out loud. However, things took a turn the second she began setting up her camera so that she could record and then post her goodness. Granted, I’m guessing here because I don’t know her, but if you take video of yourself doing something good and kind and then post said video, the person you’re attempting to highlight and for whom you’re looking to gain notoriety is Y-O-U.

This lady did many nice things, some on-camera, some off. She listened to her passenger and engaged with her passenger enough to identify a need. She then went one step further by providing for that need, exactly as Jesus expects us to do. But. The moment that she began setting up that camera just right in her car so that she could capture her generosity on camera, things went south. And that’s what I was thinking about, the staging, the orchestrating, when I shifted so rapidly from aw to ugh.

The good thing to come out of this, though, was some time spent considering how often I want recognition for the good things I do for others (and it’s way more often than I’d like to admit). God knew that as humans we’d be largely tempted to take moments like these and soil them. At our core, we tend to be selfish and vain, but God’s not shocked by that, nor is He upset with us. He made us; He knows exactly what we’re like and what worldly challenges can, and do, trip us up. He also wants to make sure we understand the error of our ways and our thinking, and in an effort to do that, He’s tucked some lessons and guidance into His Word. (Psssst! There’s not a single issue you have faced, are facing, or ever will face that’s not addressed in the Bible. So there you go.)

I’d like for us to look at a few key verses on this topic, and I’d like start with Luke 14:7-11. In these verses Jesus is directly speaking and warning us against thinking too highly of ourselves. In verse 11 He cautions, “For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.” Excellent advice for many, many a situation.

Then, Proverbs 25:27 says this: “It is not good to eat too much honey, nor is it glorious to seek one’s own glory.” It is not glorious to seek one’s own glory. Let that sink in for a minute.

God doesn’t stop there, though. He offers us more wisdom on this topic of self-glorification later in Proverbs when He encourages us to “Let someone else praise you, not your own mouth” (27:2).

But the verses that really caught me, the ones that seemed to speak directly to the heart of my human need to brag on myself or seek recognition any time I do something that I think might exalt me in the eyes of others is from Matthew 6: 1-4. Read this carefully, friends. It’s packed full.

“1 Be careful not to practice your righteousness in front of others to be seen by them. If you do, you will have no reward from your Father in Heaven.

2 So when you give to the needy, do not announce it with trumpets…to be honored by others…3 But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, 4 so that your giving may be in secret. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.”

Do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing. Wow! In other words, your good deed should be so private between you and God alone that even your non-giving hand, the one not handing out provisions to the needy, has no idea what’s happening. Videoing our “righteousness” and posting it online for others to like, comment on, and share? Yeah, not so much.

In one of her publications, Joyce Meyer tells a story about this exact concept that is so practical and relevant it’s always stayed with me. (I’m going to do a pitiful paraphrasing of her story, but hopefully you can track with me enough to get the gist of it regardless.) In her story, Joyce (I call her by her first name because we’re BFF’s) goes into a salon to get her nails done, and on that particular day, she’s wearing a broach on her blouse (maybe it was coat? I don’t know.). A fellow nail-salon patron sitting next to her comments on this beautiful piece of jewelry, and Joyce says she feels the Lord urging her to take off the pin and give it to this lady. She starts to obey, but about the time she plans to hand it over to the woman, both of the nail technicians leave the room. Wanting to make sure they see her act of generosity, Joyce waits until they are both back in the room before giving this woman her broach. Of course, as expected and desired, everyone oohhs and aahhs over Joyce’s kindness. She feels good about herself, but for only half a second because as soon as exits the nail salon, she hears God say, “I hope you enjoyed that because that’s all the reward you’re going to get.” Think that wasn’t God speaking to her? Take a quick second to re-read Matthew 6:1 above. I’ll wait.

You see, our job as Christians is to glorify God and direct others to Him. That’s it…full stop. We have no other purpose that tops pointing unbelievers to Jesus Christ, and as soon as we turn something loving and kind and gracious and compassionate into something that’s all about us, we’ve damaged that. If we exalt ourselves, we get the glory that should’ve been used to shine a light directly on Jesus. We can’t glorify ourselves AND God simultaneously; it’s a one-or-the-other kinda deal. As followers of Christ, we are to use our lives to become more like Him, to behave more and more like He did, and Jesus never once glorified Himself. Not once. And look at what all He did.

Before I close, I want to share with you a quote from Dr. Tony Evans that I ran across while preparing for this post. I felt like it was both a simple and a very profound way of looking at our desire for self-glorification. I pray it’s one that sticks with you, too. I love you all, and I think you’re all REALLY great.

“If you want to lead the orchestra, you have to be willing to turn your back on the crowd.” -Dr. Tony Evans

Dear Lord, thank You so very much for continuously drawing to my attention the areas in my life that can use a little work. Father, I understand and recognize fully that my purpose here on this planet is to bring others to You and to glorify You in all I do, think, and say. I need help with that, though, Lord, because sometimes I want recognition and accolades for my good deeds. Please help me, God, to spend much more time focused on the honor and attention given to You than to myself. Help me to worry only about glorifying You so that You can be responsible for glorifying me. I know that life will be much better and my blessings much larger that way. Let others see You through me, Lord. I love You, Father, and I am so grateful for Your constant love. In Jesus’s name I pray. Amen.