Practical Pants

G’day, mates! (I hope you read that in a pitifully done Australian accent because that’s certainly how it sounded in my head.) I’ve come to you today with the purpose of having a wee discussion, and in order to do so, it’s going to require that we all put on our practical pants. Can we agree to do that? Fabulous! I’ll give you a minute to locate yours and change.

On the heels of our discussion in the last blog post about New Year’s resolutions, I’ve been thinking a lot about the process of improvement, especially with regard to our lives. So many people have such incredible intentions when it comes to resolutions and such, but then life gets in the way, plans peter out, and by March we’re all right back to doing whatever it was we were doing in November when we decided THINGS ARE GOING TO CHANGE! I’m always curious to see what people decide to change about themselves and their lifestyles, and more often than not, the resolution or goal or “lifestyle change” (I’m pretty sure every time someone uses that worn-out phrase a vegan is force-fed a hamburger) is in such contrast to how that person lives now it’s no wonder people go back to their same old ways.

In order to make this topic less massive and in an effort to focus it toward the area of our lives that’s most important, I want to talk with you today specifically about goal-setting in your spiritual life. Maybe you’ve not been where I have, but I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve set goals to read my Bible more, to wake up and pray before I start my day, to journal all my prayers and catalogue each way I see God throughout my day only to have these things either 1) not happen AT ALL or 2) not stick around must past February. In examining why I found myself struggling so much to maintain these useful–albeit lofty–new “habits” I discovered that I cared much more about the action itself than I did about the result I was getting from it. In other words, my focus was on the time on my clock (that I woke up at 5:30am or that I spent at least 15 minutes praying); it wasn’t on whom I was supposed to be doing all this for: God. And in addition to that, I wasn’t even taking into consideration my personality (um, yeah, 5:30am is NOT gonna happen for this gal). So my chance of success was already greatly endangered before I ever got my resolution or goal off the ground. I’m guessing something similar has either happened to you before or is maybe even happening to you as we speak. Without judgment, let me ask you this: being fully honest with yourself, how is that resolution working out for you? Has it lost some of its newness already? Can you feel it shifting from an exciting, bold “lifestyle change” to a tedious, burdensome “one more thing to do”?

So with regard to spiritual goal-setting, maybe we can take a second and discuss just a couple of things really quickly. I pray that as we do, it will be relevant to the good you’re doing in your life, the changes you’re making to honor God, and that it will help keep those changes on track long after all your buddies stop going to the gym. First, I think it’s important that we discuss what types of goals it’s necessary to set if you want long-term success. Now I know we all had roughly 2.5 “guest speakers” during our school years who attempted to bestow upon our less-than-interested teenage selves this information, but you and I both know we were writing notes and folding them up in weird not-quite-origami shapes instead of listening. Hopefully it all makes a little bit more sense (and is actually applicable) this time around. So without further ado, here is what I think goal(s) must be in order to even begin journeying toward success:

Spiritual goals must be

*reasonable/realistic for YOUR personality and schedule

*measurable–do you have a way to determine if you are or are not succeeding at your goal?

*rational and/or practical (look, you get to wear your practical pants again!)

Now, to make this as clear as a I can and hopefully as concise as I can, let’s apply these requirements to spiritual goals in three main areas: Bible reading, praying, and finances/tithing.

Bible reading

Let’s pretend that you’ve decided that 2020 is going to be the year that you read the ENTIRE BIBLE front to back. It’s a good goal, right? It’s measurable. Check. Is it practical? We’ll, let’s see. Do you have reading plan? No? Okay then. Do you know what time of the day you’ll read? No? Okay. Do you own a Bible? Yes? Oh okay, great. That’s a good start. So, tell me about your current Bible reading. How often to do you read the Bible? Zero, you say? Let me make sure I understand. You currently do zero Bible reading and without any type of reading plan or pre-planned method of attack, you’re going to take out the entire Bible when you’ve somehow not managed to even read a single chapter up to this point? Hmmmmm. I mean, I am well aware of the abounding sarcasm here, but how well do you expect this to go? Friends, you and I both know this just ain’t gonna happen. How do I know? Because I’ve tried it!

My intentions were good. At the time I wasn’t a Bible reader and I wanted to fix that. I read A LOT, but I had never read the Bible cover-to-cover and I thought that since I had recently entered my 30’s, the time had arrived. I was going to get up early, I was going to magically shake off the sleepiness, and I was going to make it through with no problem. Well, I did this about five or six times before I realized that I had a tendency to sleep-read and 5:30 was really dang early. And do you know what I did when my goal failed? I beat myself up over it. I felt like my Bible reading HAD to be done in the morning; I felt like God wouldn’t speak to me clearly if I wasn’t reading my Bible the very first thing every day. But, y’all, I did that to myself. Sure, it’s wise to start your day with the Word, to have it fresh in your mind so that as your day presents itself, with all its struggles and surprises, you’ve got Truth fresh in your mind. What I’m here to tell you today, though, friend, is that GOD JUST WANTS YOU. He’s not upset if it’s on your lunch break. He’s not angry because your Bible reading happened in the car waiting in the pick-up line. He just wants your heart tuned to His frequency during your day. He wants to bless you with the peace and encouragement that you absolutely cannot get anywhere but in His Word. If you’re in a season of life where you can’t do early morning Bible reading, cut yourself some slack. Find the time that works for you (FYI—I still don’t do mine first thing) and commit to being more interested in the Bible you’re reading than the time of day that you’re reading it.

And one last thing about Bible reading goals before I move on. Try not to get caught up in the specifics: what book to read, how long to read, etc. I started out by getting a devotional so that it could help me work my way through the Bible. Then, after I did a devotional or two, I began feeling more comfortable forging my own way through various chapters. You can’t go wrong with Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John, either. Again, God isn’t sitting on His throne, stop-watch in hand. Ask Him for His help in finding the time, try out various times of the day and various reading plans, and keep at it. You’ll get there.

Praying

A few years ago I decided that I was going to wake up every morning at like 5:15 or 5:30 or some other dumb time and I was going to pray before I started my day. Seemed like that is what preachers always talked about doing and I was pretty sure that’s what both Joyce Meyer AND Beth Moore did, so obviously by not doing this I was already terrible at this Christian walk thing. So, I set my alarm and when it went off each morning, I would flip on my lamp, lean back in bed against my pillows, and pray. Y’all. I did this for about two weeks and NOT ONE TIME did I stay awake. Not once! I had a very young child who barely slept and it was a time in my life when I got very little rest and/or sleep. Was this goal a rational, reasonable, realistic goal for me? Well of course it wasn’t. It was another r-word: ridiculous. Yet another spiritual goal I failed because I was so busy focusing on these crazy rules I’d put on my walk with God. Self-regulating instead of God-regulating my prayer life was never going to lead me to success.

If you’re here too–or if you’ve been here before and since just given up on the whole thing altogether–there’s a really simple way to do this. Talk to God about it. Pray more. Let that be your motto. Work prayer into your day at a variety of times. Practice taking your issues to God when they crop up throughout your day instead of ignoring Him until 5:30 each morning when you utter two words to Him and then promptly fall back asleep. God just wants to be with you, to be invited in. With His help, start slowly and reasonably. Decide that instead of listening to a podcast or satellite radio on your way to work each day, you’re going to pray. Struggling to stay focused? Switch your regular radio out for praise music and then pause for two minutes on your way out of the car and into work to thank God for something in your life. Starting small isn’t insignificant. And I’m telling you because I know from experience, friends, God will bless even the smallest efforts when the desire for Him is genuine and present.

Tithing

Watch out, everybody, Lindsey’s talking about money!!! Run for your lives!!! Calm down, you nutballs. We’ll save the “to tithe or not to tithe” post for another day. Today, let’s just assume some of you have set the spiritual goal of giving back to either your church or other worthy charities/causes that further the gospel. If you have never ever tithed, or if you’ve resolved to do so only to take that money and put it toward other things after the “new” wore off, let’s apply that same logic, reason, and practicality to this goal as we have the previous two. So yes, the Bible states that a tithe is to be 10%. However, given what I know about God, about His love and His compassionate understanding and His slowness to anger, I’m going to go out on a limb here (insert sarcasm emoji here) and say that if you go from giving nothing to giving something smaller than 10%, you will not be struck down dead where you stand. If 10% seems astronomical to you, if the whole concept of tithing is hard to get your head around but you feel God prompting you to start somewhere, then do exactly that. Start somewhere…somewhere small. Okay, so maybe 10% gives you hives. Does 5%? Still feel like you’re wearing a sweater your great-aunt Nadine knitted you? Then what about 2%? Surely by now you’re starting to see my point with regard to ANY spiritual goal you set for yourself: it’s not about the rules, it’s about the relationship you’re building in the process. Talk to God about your finances. Ask Him to show you where that money can come from. Ask Him to bless your giving. Ask Him to show you that your tithe counts toward good. I can tell you from SERIOUS personal experience many, many times over, God WILL show up. He will bless your efforts, and He will take pride in helping you move from a 1.567% tithe to a 10% to a who-knows-what percent.

**Okay, money talk is over. You can stop covering your eyes.**

While I know many of you probably don’t need this post because you’re knocking it out of the park in these areas, maybe it’ll be something you can apply to other ones that aren’t going quite so well. I find myself sometimes getting certain aspects of my walk with Christ on track and then losing ground in others. Sometimes I can need to be reminded that these concepts–be realistic, measure your progress but don’t harp on it, start small–can be applied to a variety of goals, skills or areas in which I’m attempting to strengthen my faith. Whatever you are doing well or blowing up completely, friends, God loves you with an unstoppable love. You are NOT disappointing Him, even when you disappoint yourself. When we stumble in our efforts to do better, He’s not there waiting to chastise us and remind us of our failures. He wants to offer His hand, His help up, and His love. Let’s be mindful of the goals we set; let’s cut ourselves some slack; let’s get right back on track when we get off. And most importantly, let’s remember why we’re doing this in the first place: Jesus. Not once has He ever left someone to better themselves on their own. Let Him help. Oh, and one last thing, let’s try wearing our practical pants a little more often. 🙂

Dear Lord, thank You so very much for Jesus, that He’s available to help me as I try my best to mature my walk with You and strengthen our relationship. I ask for Your help, God, because I know that I can’t readjust my life without Your help. I want to do better in many areas, and I offer those up to You today. Help me to stay consistent in my Bible reading, Lord, but help me also to be more interested in what I’m learning about You than I am about how much or how long I read. Father, I ask too that You would help me come to You more often in prayer. I want to talk to You throughout the day, Lord, but I also want that important time alone with You as well. Help me to take an honest look at my life and my schedule so that I can better use it on what’s most important: You. And lastly, Lord, be with me and my finances. Help me to see my money as Yours. Help me to give it cheerfully, knowing You will bless me, Lord. Right now tithing seems like giving away money, but I know that it’s really just handing back to You what’s rightfully Yours. Be with me, Father, as I learn this tough lesson. Help me to see the fruits of my labor. I love You, Lord, and I know that You love me, too. Draw me closer to You. In Jesus’s name I pray. Amen.

Seek God

Good afternoon, friends, and Happy New Year! I pray that this post finds you all still stuffed from all you ate at Christmas and looking optimistically into the things God will bring your way in 2020.

This time last year I wrote a post that discussed the importance of focusing on the spiritual aspects of our lives as we make resolutions and attempt changing our lifestyles, and today, I want to reiterate that somewhat. I think going into this next year with new goals and plans is a FABULOUS way to do life. I mean, if you can’t dream about your future you’ve got big problems! But I think it’s foolish to walk forward without giving thought to how things went for us last year, how we did with those areas most important to our lives as children of God, and how we plan to do better this coming year in those same important areas.

Now, before I begin getting into the scriptural meat of all of this, I want to make sure my tone/intention is clear. While it might sound a little bit like it, I’m not opposed to those resolutions or goals or plans that include the fun, trendy ideas like veganism, Keto dieting, and yoga with goats (this last one is pretty much how I envision Heaven). But, if you are doing these things without inviting God to be a part of it, that’s where I see a problem. No one cares if you’re vegan if your soul shrivels.  You know what I’m saying? You can Keto diet until you’re so tiny strong winds are a fierce threat to your welfare, but what good is that skinnier thigh if your heart is hard and Jesus is a distant acquaintance? (Somebody better say AMEN right here)

Here today, at the start of this blank slate, this fresh year where we have so many new blessings and opportunities heading our way, I want us to meet together and remind ourselves where our focus should truly be. I want to ask you a couple of questions, friends, and please know I do so gently and without judgment. Please take a minute and answer these for yourself as honestly as possible.

With regard to 2019:

  1. How much time on a daily, or even weekly, basis did you spend in personal Bible reading? (Sermons at church don’t count–those aren’t personal reading times.)
  2. How often did you turn immediately to scripture when you felt upset, troubled, or stressed?
  3. How often did you air your worries/concerns/upsets/grievances on social media but not in prayer Jesus?
  4. How often did you talk to others about Jesus? How many people did you witness to in 2019?
  5. When you do talk about Jesus to someone, how do you feel internally? Is it easy and comfortable, or do rivers form in your armpits?
  6. Which scriptures did you commit to memory this past year?
  7. What biblical principles can you say you definitely have worked on during the trials and tribulations of this past year?
  8. On a scale of 1-10, with ten being “BFFs,” where do you and Jesus rank?
  9. What character traits of God’s have you seen most throughout the challenges you faced this past year?
  10. And finally, if those closest to you were asked about your spiritual growth, would they be able to provide evidence of an increase?

Y’all, this list of questions, when I answer them with complete honesty, humbles me tremendously. It’s not that any of us are bad at being representatives of God, but spiritual maturity is such a “two steps forward and three steps back” process that we’d be remiss to move forward into another year worrying about things like weight loss and budgets when our spiritual selves are what they are. {Side note: if you get your spiritual self strengthened and nourished, those others areas of your life that are out of control (finances, diet/health, emotions, marriage, etc.) are WAY more likely to work themselves out with the help of the Holy Spirit. A distant heart mutes the Holy Spirit, so we’ve gotta get that part sorted out first.}

So now maybe you’re tracking with me, you understand the point I’m making about what areas of our lives our goals and resolutions should address foremostly (that is not a word, but I feel like that’s a grave error on the part of humankind so that joker is staying), but although you get what I’m saying, you’re just not sure how to improve spiritually. You’ve resolved to read your Bible more in the past and it’s never happened. You’ve resolved to pray more, but that’s never materialized either. You’ve made lists and bought apps and set earlier alarms and borrowed everybody else’s plans, and you’re still the same ole you; you still don’t read your Bible much, you harbor guilt over your prayer life, and sleeping in is ALWAYS preferable. Well good news, friend–I have a solution for you! And, it’s an easy one that involves only two words: SEEK GOD.

Yep, that’s it. Seek God. In thinking about New Year’s and its resolutions and everyone’s need to set goals and decide what in their lives should be changed or altered or eliminated or added, I suddenly wondered, How many times are these plans being made because we first sought God and asked HIM what we should alter or change or eliminate? Being totally honest, I bet it’s not very many. That’s my encouragement for this year: before you make decisions about your life, before you set goals or rearrange your budget or alter your diet, seek God. Maybe those areas are exactly the ones that need the most work, but maybe God sees things you don’t and feels your time, efforts, money, and mental energies would be better spent in other areas with greater impact for His kingdom. Yes, being healthy is definitely of utmost importance. There’s no arguing that, especially in today’s culture. But what if you invited God into those dietary decisions you’re making? What you if asked Him to show you what changes you needed to make and asked Him for His help in becoming a healthier you? I’m guessing that since He made you, since He is fully aware of every molecule in your body, He’s a pretty good resource for guidance in that area.

One verse that I’ve spent a great deal of time with this year is Proverbs 3:5-7. I used it recently in a post, but it definitely applies here as well. It says, “Lean on, trust in, and be confident in the Lord with all your heart and mind and do not rely on your own insight or understanding. In all your ways know, recognize, and acknowledge Him, and He will direct and make straight and plain your paths. Be not wise in your own eyes…” HE will direct your path. HE will make straight your path so you’re not tricked or deceived or led astray. HE will make your path clear and plain to see, not convoluted and foggy. We cannot do those things, friends. We don’t know what God knows (His ways are higher than our ways). We cannot see what He can. Isn’t it best to let Him be in charge?

Seek God. “Seek FIRST His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be given unto you” (Matthew 6:33, emphasis mine). Y’all, there is no time of the year, no aspect of our lives when we shouldn’t wait to move until we hear directly from God. There’s no aspect, no matter how minute, that we shouldn’t lay bare before Him and ask Him to guide and bless. Can you imagine what your 2020 would look like if you truly chose to seek God before anything else, including Him in all areas? His blessings are great; His favor immeasurable. He is always faithful; He cannot go back on His Word; His ways are always good. In Jeremiah 29, God tells us exactly what He has up His sleeve if we’ll only partner with Him in the coming year, letting go of our own plans and ways: “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’–this is the Lord’s declaration–‘plans for your welfare, not for disaster, to give a future and a hope. You will call to Me and come and pray to Me, and I will listen to you. You will seek Me and find Me when you search for Me with all your heart.'” (verses 11-13, HCSB) Instead of seeking those things that we’ve not consulted God about, instead of seeking those earthly goals or devising our own “wise” plans, how about we all decide that this year, in 2020, we’re simply going to seek God and let Him direct our steps (Prov. 16:9). Are you with me, friends?

Dear Father, thank You for letting me see another day and another year. Thank You from the bottom of my heart for the many, many blessings in 2019. I ask, Lord, that You pour out Your love, favor, and grace over my 2020. May You bless my family, my friends, and all of Your children, God. As I begin 2020, I desire to seek You, Father, above all things. Help me to push aside the things of this world that crowd my mind for attention. Help me to seek Your input, Your guidance, Your voice, and Your will above all other things. Lord, I don’t want to participate in or waste energy on a single goal or plan or resolution that’s not been okayed first by You. I ask that You please make clear to me those areas in my life that YOU choose to have me work on. Grant me clarity and discernment, Father, so that I am able to line my heart and my life right up with Yours. I thank You that, because of You, my future is hopeful and full of promise and blessing. I look forward to a deeper, more substantial relationship with You in this next year. I pray that when 2021 arrives, my spiritual progress, though it is slow, is recognizable to anyone and everyone who knows me. It’s in Jesus’s mighty and holy name I move and pray. Amen.

Getting Our “Buts” In Shape

Y’all. We are seven days into January, and I am already 110% over all this hot-air talk about resolutions. This is my least favorite part of the New Year celebrations (is capitalizing that correct? I have no idea). I do think it’s wise to self-evaluate, and I think it’s definitely worth your time to reflect on your life, your health, your choices, and especially your relationship with God, but if you’re only doing that once a year and only because it’s the trendy thing to do? Yeah, um, good luck with that. We’re a week in, so I’m guessing the fire’s already gone out of that plan, hasn’t it? (Don’t act like you haven’t already justified eating french fries in 2019.)

{steps down from soap box}

Since many, many people (and most likely some of you, dear readers) begin the new year with aspirations toward eating healthier and getting fit, just this once I’ll play along, too. See, I do play well with others after all. But before we strut into the metaphorical gym to begin working on our fitness (10 bonus points if you recognized that long-lost Fergilicious lyric), I’d like to introduce you to a friend of mine, Naaman.

Our new comrade Naaman can be found in the book of 2 Kings in chapter 5. The Bible tell us, “Naaman, Commander of the army of the king of Syria, was a great man with his master, accepted [and acceptable], because by him the Lord had given victory to Syria. He was also a mighty man of valor, but he was a leper” (vs. 1). Wow, so impressive. Here is a man who is not only given favor by God, but his favor with God has led to his having favor with his peers and with his king. Perhaps I’m alone in this, but no one has ever described me as a person of valor (definition: boldness or determination in facing great danger; heroic courage or bravery). There are so many remarkable things about Naaman, many notable qualities that stand out so much he makes it into the Word of God. But. Then that small yet potent word shows up and everything changes.

Look back at 2 Kings 5:1 above, and as that scripture draws to a close, pay close attention to the pivotal shift following “but”….ah, there we have it. Naaman’s “but” is leprosy. He is smart. He is strong. He is a capable and noble leader. He is favored by God and man. He is a battle-wise, brave warrior. BUT. He is a leper. And just like that, all that we saw Naaman as, all of those touted character traits of this highly-regarded soldier are tainted because now he is diseased. Now that we know he’s infected, covered in ulcerated skin and deemed wholly unclean, now that we know all of this, it changes everything.

Commander of the Syrian army.

A great man.

Accepted and acceptable.

Victorious.

A mighty man of valor.

BUT…

A leper.

Friends, as it turns out, you and I aren’t all that different from Commander Naaman after all. Each of us has a long list of admirable qualities. Each of us has particular traits that others appreciate, respect, admire, and even envy. And like our new buddy Naaman, each of us has a “but” holding us back from reaching our full potential.

Now, I don’t know what your “but” is: fear, anger/bitterness, rejection, unmet needs, failing health/disease, insecurity, doubt, spiritual apathy, lack of passion/contentment, addiction, past failure, shame, debt, unhealthy habitual behavior, sexual sin, and the list could go on and on. Despite not knowing exactly what it is you’re struggling to put behind you as you go into this new year, this season of personal resolution and renewal, I do know that Jesus is the answer. I mean, if you need proof that God can use you, that He can help you rise above whatever it is that’s tethered you to a mediocre life, just look at Naaman! He was a leper for crying out loud. He was someone who, in biblical times, was considered an outcast, who people would avoid walking by on the street, and here he is in the Bible! He’s applauded and used by God to bring victory to a chosen people. He’s successful. He’s the very opposite of shunned: he was acceptable and accepted. A leper, and yet commander and right-hand man to the king.

There’s not a thing you’ve done, not a thing you could ever do, that would make you useless to God. He loves you. He sees your diseased skin, your outcast status, and He patiently awaits your turning to Him to shower you with favor. He can make you well; He can heal your physical, mental, and emotional hurt. But we have to give those things to Him. We have to decide that we’re no longer going to be held back by whatever we’ve been carrying around. We have to choose to believe that God is bigger than our “leprosy.” To put it in New Year’s resolution terms, we have to get our “buts” in shape so that we don’t prevent the blessings, the favor, and the forward progress for His Kingdom that God can bring to fruition in our lives.

And guess what else God can do–He can fully heal you! Skip ahead in 2 Kings chapter 5 to verses 11-14. At this time, Naaman has gone to the prophet Elisha in an effort to have his leprosy cured. Totally able to help Naaman, Elisha gives him simple instructions for how to be fully cured, and verses 11 and 12 show us Naaman’s reaction to these directives: “But Naaman was angry and went away and said, Behold, I thought he would surely come out to me and stand and call on the name of the Lord his God, and wave his hand over the place and heal the leper…So he turned and went away in a rage.” I’m sorry–what? You have been told exactly what to do in order to cure yourself of this horrible, painful disease and you’re ticked? You see, Naaman had this other little problem, too, on top of the leprosy issue; Naaman was prideful. He was a great man, remember? And do you also remember he was a ranking official in the army and a brave warrior? Well then, how dare Elisha send a messenger and not come in person to cure him! How dare he suggest that Naaman the great and mighty wash in the filthy waters of the Jordan River when other cleaner bodies of water were nearby! Why was there no pomp and circumstance to the healing of such a man as Naaman?! (insert foot stomp here) And so Naaman walked away in a rage.

If you skip down to verses 13 and 14, you’ll see that after he’s cooled off some, Naaman’s servants are able to talk some sense into him, and he does eventually follow Elisha’s instructions. And because we serve a God who is so loving, who is the God of second (and third and fourth and fifth) chances, He doesn’t take back His power because Naaman acted like a toddler. Instead, once Naaman gets his act together and dips himself the required seven times in the Jordan, God heals him completely, “…and his flesh was restored like that of a little child, and he was clean.”

There is so much we could discuss from this. We could spend a long time discussing how leprosy in the Bible is always a symbol for sin. We would talk about this symbolic baptism, how Naaman took his leprosy/his sin, gave it over to the commands of God, accepted God’s sovereignty and ability, believed that God would do what He said He would do, and was healed. How he was washed totally clean in a river full of dirty water after giving up his pride and his own expectations, and simply placing his trust in God. For today, however, I think it best if we just focus on the near-miss of Naaman’s story. What if he hadn’t checked his pride and followed God’s instructions? What if he’d decided he was too important to dirty himself in the Jordan? What if he’d decided he knew more than God, that God couldn’t possibly be right to go about answering his prayer in this way? This story would’ve ended VERY differently, and, friends, if you and I don’t get pride eradicated from our lives, our stories might end very differently as well.

Proverbs 3:5-7 encourages Christ-followers to “Lean on, trust in, and be confident in the Lord with all your heart and mind and do not rely on your own insight or understanding. In all your ways know, recognize, and acknowledge Him, and He will direct and make straight and plain your paths. Be not wise in your own eyes.” This right here. This attitude and mindset is my goal for 2019. Not only believing IN God, but simply believing God. Believing He will do what His Word says He will. Swapping my pride and selfish expectation for God’s Will. Reducing self and enlarging God. Together, let’s make 2019 the year of getting our ‘buts’ in shape and getting pride out of our lives so that God can both use us AND heal us.

Dear Lord, thank You so much that You are willing to use me just as I am. Thank You, Father, for Your unconditional acceptance. Help me, Lord, to give You anything and everything that holds me back, that encourages space between me and You. Father, I know You want good things for me, that You plan to bless me and prosper me. In this coming year, please help it to be one of health, of happiness, of restoration, and of healing. Father, I ask that You begin a work in me that doesn’t fade away with the coming months. Light a fire in me for You and Your Word, Lord, that never dims. Help me to get right with You, God, so that I can show You to others. May my 2019 be one of spiritual growth and maturity, but may it also be one dedicated to living for You. Please, Lord, help me to glorify You with each day. Thank You that perfection isn’t a qualification that You require me to have. I love You, Father, and I thank You for hearing my prayer. May Your Will be done in my life in 2019. In Jesus’s name I pray. Amen.