Praise The LORD For Your Soul

Recently, for another blog post, I began researching the multitude of questions Jesus asks throughout His time in the New Testament. While so many are poignant (because that’s how Jesus rolls…loaded questions were His jam!), one really caused me to stop and seriously ponder what a truthful, heart-based, personal answer would sound like. I want to share this same question with you, and I ask that you genuinely pause and reflect upon your response as well. The question from Jesus comes from Matthew 16:15 (the emphasis is mine).

But who do you say that I am?

To me, not much else arrows straight to the root of our personal relationships with Jesus like this direct (and loaded!) question. And given the season that is upon us, the incredible celebration of Easter, I feel that it’s of utmost value (of necessity even!) that we truthfully, authentically, prayerfully answer this question for ourselves. Not to steal Christian comedian John Crist’s catchphrase, but let this question prompt us to check our hearts (and our lives and our thoughts and our words and our actions), to reorder our schedules /priorities/lives so that when our sacrificial Savior asks “But who do you say that I am?” we don’t have to answer back to Him things like “an obligation,” “unimportant,” “not worth my time,” or “someone I don’t ever talk about.”

I’d like to go ahead and warn you upfront (although maybe warn is a bit too strong) that for most of you, this particular post might not be for you. In fact, it might not apply to you much at all, especially if your relationship with Jesus is flourishing and mature. To be honest, it’s that fact that’s kept me from writing this post for several months now. Have y’all ever been there before? Have y’all ever sensed God lead you to do a certain thing, one about which your incredibly wise human brain said, “I don’t think that’s really all that necessary”? Yeah, well. That’s pretty much how I’ve reacted when God’s placed this blog post on my heart: Ya sure about that, God? I mean, like, fully certain? I’m sure You aren’t so I’ll just circle on back around some other time if that’s swell with You. The Holy Spirit did lead me in other (hopefully useful) directions with my writings, but this nudge never went away completely. And I don’t if it’s because God needs to use it right now or if it’s because it’s Easter or what, but apparently ’tis time.

You see, I pushed this idea to the side because I felt like it wouldn’t apply to many of you, as I mentioned before. However, after careful consideration of that biblical question from Jesus, I felt that it was too important to pass up. Besides, God works in ways that I can’t (hallelujah!), so I know that if only one person reads this post today, or in the coming days/weeks, and it touches his/her heart, it was so very worth the rest of us reading a message that may not apply to us.

Friends, while it’s my goal through this blog site to share Jesus in a real-world, relatable way, it’s all pointless if you don’t know Jesus on a personal level, as your very personal Savior. So let me very gently and in a very non-judgmental way ask you a critical question to go along with Jesus’s: Are you saved? Have you declared to God through your words that you believe Jesus is the Son of God, that He came to earth to save us from ourselves and our sinfulness and death by taking our shame and punishment up on that cross? Have you verbally declared that you believe Jesus died on the cross, was placed in the tomb only to defeat death (for good!) by raising from the dead three days later, eventually rising back up into Heaven to stay until He comes back for us one day? If not, if you’ve never made this life-changing declaration, how about today? Dear Beloved by God, how about right now?

Romans 10:9 promises this: If you openly declare that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.

John 10:9 says it this way, from the very mouth of Jesus: Yes, I am the gate. Those who come in through me will be saved.

Acts 4:12 uses these words: There is salvation in no one else! God has given no other name under heaven by which we must be saved.

And Ephesians 2:9 helps us understand that, Salvation is not a reward for the good things we have done…[God] has created us anew in Christ Jesus.

So what’s the commonality here? Jesus Christ. We make it legalistic and complicated, but it’s really very simple. Do you believe Jesus is who He says He is, who the Bible says He is? If so and you feel led to follow the biblical guidelines to salvation, I ask that you just pray this prayer with me (out loud if you are comfortable with that).

Father God, thank You for Your Son–for Jesus Christ. Thank You for His death on the cross and His resurrection three days later. Thank You, Lord, for Your Word which I believe with my whole heart. I accept Jesus as my Savior, Father, and I thank You that all the goodness of Jesus and the guiding force of the Holy Spirit now reside within me. In Jesus’s holy name I prayer this prayer for salvation. Amen.

CONGRATULATIONS! Don’t you feel lighter already? You just signed a covenant with the Maker of the ENTIRE Universe, who loves you, desires you, and is so proud of you! (Be sure and check the bottom of this post for the “Now What?!” section to help you know where to go from here with your newly-accepted salvation.)

While I’m beyond excited and happy to potentially help someone make such an important, life-changing decision, I don’t want to skip past those of us who might be caught up somewhere in the middle. Maybe you prayed a similar prayer for salvation once upon a time and followed it with a relationship with Jesus. But maybe life has happened since then–maybe A LOT of life–and in an effort to keep your other relationships afloat, you’ve let yours with Jesus dissipate. First, before anything else, let me say this very seriously and sternly: GOD IS NOT MAD AT YOU. Zero upset on His part. He misses you. He loves you, and He anxiously awaits a renewing of that dedication to Him and a life full of Him that you once had. All it takes is for you to get tired enough of feeling Satan yank you around, speaking lies, that you change your course. My friend, you cannot do this on your own. It takes you in partnership with God, with Him at the reigns. How do you get there? The same way you get anywhere and everywhere: prayer. And I invite you to say this prayer with me to re-solidify your relationship with your Heavenly Father (again, out loud if you’re comfortable with that):

Dear Lord, I miss You, and I recognize that the distance between us isn’t because You moved away from me. Father, I recognize that I am not meant to do life without You, and I ask for Your help in returning to a right relationship with You. I desire for You to be at the forefront of my life, Lord, but I’m not even sure where to start. I ask today that You please move in my life; forgive me, please, for my choices and my distance. Help me to return to You. I rededicate my life to You, Father God, and I’m so grateful for the open arms with which You greet me today. Thank You for Your Son Jesus, whose death and resurrection make this possible. In His name I pray. Amen.

I trust that within at least one heart a small opening was created, one in which God has shown Himself. I pray that regardless of where your maturity falls with regard to your relationship with Jesus that you spend some intentional, prioritized time this Easter to study the precious Word of God for yourself, instead of letting someone spoon-feed it to you. I pray that during this time, you’ll be reminded of the incredible, unmatched love that He has for you. What a mighty God we serve indeed! Happy Easter, my friends! May you fully encounter Jesus this holiday weekend.

So…..now what?!

If you prayed that prayer with me earlier and accepted Jesus into your heart, you’re probably wondering where to go from here. Biblically, our acceptance of Jesus, our being saved, is a 2-parter. Part one, we have to pray and ask Him into our hearts…so check mark on that! Part one can be done publicly or privately; it counts no matter what. But part two is definitely for public consumption; part two is baptism. If you’ll reach out to a local church or a friend with a home church (or come go to church with me!), you’ll find it’s filled with fellow believers anxious to help you celebrate the private decision you made with public baptism. Trust me.

Afterward–or in the waiting while you’re building up your courage to get your face wet in public–get yourself a Bible, a highlighter, a notebook, and a pen. Set aside time on a DAILY basis to talk to God, to listen to God, and to read His Word. He’ll do the rest. I mean it–He will do ALL of the heavy lifting.

If at any point I can help you, pray for you, or encourage you, you can find me at lindseydt@gmail.com. Please reach out.

I mean, I am so excited! I hope you are, too. Praise the Lord for your soul; it is of UTMOST importance to Him. Now go celebrate Easter like never before. 🙂

Did God Really Say…

To start this blog post, I’m going to need a little class participation, umkay?

When I say “Girl Scout cookies,” you say “of the devil”! Got it? Let’s go!!!!

Me: “Girl Scout cookies!”

You: “Of the devil!”

Me: “Girl Scout cookies!”

You: “Of the devil!”

{clap!clap!clap!clap!clap!}

Y’all, what is it about those things? I have a sneaking suspicion that those sweet little Girl Scout pushers know their products are crack-infused and are purposefully keeping it a secret. I literally can not even like a particular type of Girls Scout cookie, but if that flavor is sitting on my counter (I’m talking to you, Tagalongs!), I will eat it anyway. WHAT IS WRONG WITH ME?! And you know what’s even worse? I will sometimes eat the first one, think to myself, man, that wasn’t as good as a I wanted it to be, then eat another dadgum cookie like they’ll miraculously get better with a second one! Believe it or not, in most situations, I’m an intelligent person! Ugh, so stupid.

But, friends, isn’t this exactly how temptation works? We are such smart people. We make smart decisions in our lives; we understand how cause and effect works; we fully realize when foods/people/relationships/thoughts aren’t healthy for us, but you get us around any of those, and suddenly we are partaking of said temptation like it’s suddenly become a great idea.

Luckily for us, God knew we were weak. He knew that we would give in, that we would struggle to hold strong and steady when faced with something–big or small–that we really wanted but that we shouldn’t have. Remember that whole “And lead us not into temptation” part that Jesus taught His disciples to pray? Yeah, there was a reason for that. He knew that for His children temptation was going to be a big issue.  In fact, just like 99.9% of everything else we’ve discussed on here, God made sure to give us guidance and insight into temptation and how we’re expected to handle it within His Word.

There are a couple of scriptures I’d like us to examine, so let’s first start with James 1:13-14: “When tempted, no one should say, ‘God is tempting me.’ For God cannot be tempted by evil, nor does He tempt anyone; but each one is tempted when, by his own evil desire, he is dragged away and enticed.” If God is not the source of our temptation, then who is? We are! Y’all, James is so good about coming right out with it, telling us the truth about our actions without sugar-coating it for our tender egos. In these verses, I imagine him pointing his finger in my face and telling me to stop tempting myself; stop putting myself in situations where I’m likely to face temptation and then blaming God for the temptation I face. It. Is. Not. His. Doing. Thank you, James, duly noted.

Fortunately, like all earthly roads, we aren’t expected to travel this one alone. Paul encourages us in 1 Corinthians 10:13 with these words on temptation: “No temptation has seized you except what is common to man. And God is faithful; He will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, He will also provide a way out so that you can stand up under it.” This verse is a little denser than the one previous, so let’s take a minute to unpack it.

First, Paul wants us to rest in the fact that regardless of the temptation we are facing–no matter how many, no matter how serious–we aren’t alone. There exists not a single temptation that hasn’t already tried its hand on someone else.

Second, GOD. IS. FAITHFUL. (I say “God!” You say” Faithful!” HAHA! Kidding! We did that already.) In all seriousness, though, God isn’t going to suddenly decide you don’t need Him. He created us to need Him. He desperately wants us to recognize our need for Him. If you reach out to Him in the midst of temptation, He literally cannot be unfaithful to you. It’s not possible.  Being the God of abundance, He’s going to go even one step further. Not only will He make absolutely certain that you don’t topple over into this temptation, but He promises to provide for you a way out. I love how His saving of us is described here: “He will also provide a way out so that you can stand up under it.” Friends, we will not be crushed by our temptations. We will not be defeated IF we make sure God’s facing off against it with us.

In the face of temptation, you and I have essentially two options: choose the temptation or choose to walk away. Let’s state this another way, though, that really drives home the fact that our choice in the midst of temptation is truly about whether or not we opt to let God be God. In the face of temptation, we have two choices: Trust (believe God and His promises for deliverance) OR Doubt (believe Satan and his lies that God can’t save us from whatever pulls so strongly on us).

As our verses from James told us, temptation isn’t from God. It’s from us, from our own inherently evil desires. And guess who ALWAYS has his nasty little serpent hiss right in our ears when our ungodly temptations get amplified. This isn’t new. In fact, this is the very oldest strategy of the enemy’s. You don’t even have to turn many pages in the Bible before you see Satan first whispering lies into the ear of Eve as she faces the first ever temptation. In Genesis 3:1, we are warned that “the serpent was more subtle and crafty than any living creature of the field which the Lord God had made,” and we see his plan for creating doubt begin with four simple yet life-altering words: “Did God really say…” How often I’ve fallen for this strategy. How often I’ve thought I was a believer only to realize, when the going got tough, that maybe I believed in God but didn’t believe God would do what He said He would. That’s exactly how Satan likes it. He knows that if he can plant that doubt in our minds, our temptation will sound out louder than the still quiet voice of our Father who offers so selflessly to help us through the fire.

My dears, let me share with you a list: doubt, confusion, anger, immaturity, resentment, lust, greed, unforgiveness, gluttony, depression, isolation, loneliness. Do any of these encompass what you’re feeling/facing today? Here’s a little secret…not a single one of these is from or of God. Not. One. However, every single last one–plus a whole bunch of other, equally awful ones–is straight from Satan himself. Aren’t you tired? Aren’t you fed up with deciding to stand strong against a temptation, caving, feeling awful about yourself, struggling with your shame, deciding unequivocally never to find yourself in that spot again…only to end up right back there time and time again? I am. I want to stop this cycle and tell Satan once and for all that YES, God really DID say that!

So how? When staring temptation in its dangerous eye, how do we ensure success over failure?

1. KNOW GOD–I mean, personally. Daily. Know Him well enough that your first knee-jerk reaction in the face of trouble (of any sort!) is prayer. Know Him intimately so that you can shut that devil up the second he comes at you with that “Did God really say…” nonsense.

2. KNOW THE WORD–Know what the Bible says about God because that’s the only way you’ll learn what His character and His heart are all about. Know what precious, faithful promises God includes in the Bible. Declare those at your temptation! Talk back to it and that jerk of a serpent! Let them both know that God won’t let you fail. You will NOT be sucked in this time. Stand on any and every promise that points you straight past failure and on to success.

3. KNOW YOURSELF–Know when you are most tempt-able. Is it mid-day when you’re home alone? Is it late at night when everyone else is in bed? Is it while you’re out running errands? Know your areas of weakness, be they physical, sexual, spiritual, mental, or a combination. Friends, it is imperative that you know yourself, because let me tell you this, you can bet Satan knows you. “Satan is the counterfeit god of perfect timing.” I recently ran across this statement by my other BFF Beth Moore, and I could not get that quote written down fast enough. Such truth. And we are absolute fools if we think otherwise. Know yourself and do something with that knowledge to protect yourself.

One last thing before I close us out with a prayer. And wouldn’t you know it, it’s another little dose of fabulous word selection and point-making from Mrs. Beth. “No weaker house exists than one that lacks authority. Lack of authority is a breeding ground for untold recklessness and sin.” Yes, this quote was written about our literal houses, but isn’t this also very true for our bodies? Friends, we have to let God have authority over our bodies and our minds, our hearts and our desires. We have to let His Word be law in our lives so that temptation and its pusher know their place. “And the God of peace will soon crush Satan under your feet” (Romans 16:20). Know it. Declare it.

Dear Lord, thank You so much that when I am faced with a temptation of any sort, I am not alone. Thank You that You have promised to walk with me past that evil desire and to provide for me a way out. Help me, Father, to learn all I can about You, to develop such a closeness with You that Satan and his lies have no power over me. Help me to know Your Word so assuredly that I can declare it (out loud!) against the evil strategies of the enemy. Thank You, Lord, that You have already ensure my success if I simply hand my life over to You. I love You, and I am so thankful that You hear my prayer. It’s in Jesus’s name that I offer it. Amen.

Judas, Peter…and I

Do you ever have times when you’re tootling along, minding your own business and doing just fine, feeling content and okay about everything, only for your thought-life to go totally wonky? Where suddenly you’re questioning your decisions, maybe even how others feel about you (despite knowing they feel favorably and nothing has happened to change that)? For whatever reason, this is where I’ve lived lately, right smack on the corner of Insecure Circle and Self-Doubt Drive.

Here’s the deal. I guess because of age and experience, these days when feelings like these hit, I recognize them for exactly what they are: Satan’s attempts to thwart the vision God’s given me or to distract me enough, shifting my focus inward toward self so that I’m less effective in my job of sharing Jesus.

A few days ago, while in the midst of these less-than-uplifting feelings, I happened across guys from the Bible who definitely felt the weight and torment of the schemes of Satan. In truth, I’d previously judged these two rather harshly. One of them is likely in the top ten of most recognizable characters in the whole Bible; his name is Judas. The other guy, Peter, is fairly infamous himself. Continuing my full disclosure, I have always felt so scornful toward Judas (for obvious reasons) when reading his story, and toward Peter, too, to some degree, even though I do mostly understand why he chose to deny Jesus in the moments when he did.

This particular day, however, I read these stories with new eyes, I guess, because suddenly I realized that, although I love Jesus like these two fellas, I, too, have sold Him out and denied who He is. Breaking News: Judas, Peter….and I can be real jerks.

To better explain my newfound attitude, let’s focus on Matthew 26, and let’s look specifically at verse 15. Speaking to Jesus’s persecutors, Judas says, “What are you willing to give me if I hand Him over to you?” Their answer: 30 pieces of silver, which, shockingly, is the equivalent of approximately $21.60 today. Let me type that again just in case you missed it. Jesus Christ was sold out by someone who claimed to love and honor Him for a measly $21.60. I can’t even make this compute in my broken brain.

My knee-jerk, gut reaction here is judgement and scorn. (Loathing, perhaps?) How dare you, Judas!! It’s not like any amount would be okay, but seriously, that puny sum?! I judge Judas’s choices, question his character, and reserve ZERO understanding or compassion toward this traitor. And just when I’ve gotten my own sense of self-righteousness good and inflated, God pokes a stick-pin in it, and I suddenly realize Judas and I aren’t so polar opposite after all.

You see, Friends, I, too, have sold Jesus out for a small price…and I’ve done it more than once. I mean, of course no one has ever paid me money to literally hand Jesus over, but I have turned my back on Him in an effort to gain other, worldly things:

*money

*human recognition or praise

*likes on social media

*personal comfort

*convenience

*appearance

*popularity/acceptance

And the list continues. I’ve even sold Him out because I wasn’t brave enough, because I let fear speak louder than He did. Can you identify with any of these yourself?

Jesus addresses this sort of behavior in Matthew 26:24. His words apply not only to Judas, but also to those of us who consider ourselves Christians while attempting to gain the things of this world. Jesus warns us, “Woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been better (more profitable and wholesome) for that man if he had never been born!” Yikes! Hard truths followed by exclamation points, so you know it was something about which Jesus felt very strongly.

Judas sold out Jesus with false devotion for a pathetic price. Turning Jesus over, Judas “embraced Him and kissed Him with [pretended] warmth and devotion” (Matthew 26:49). Sounds awful, right? Sounds horrendous and hurtful and unimaginable. But, y’all, we do this. We go to church (many of us even go twice a week! And all the good Christians said, Amen.). We raise our hands in worship, we serve, we attend small groups or Sunday school classes, and we wear our devotion to Jesus externally, making sure everyone knows. Then, we go home, and the rest of our lives and our behavior–at work, within our marriages, within our households–is void of Jesus and His love. You and me and Judas…we’re all sell-outs.

And let’s not forget our other comrade, Peter. Most of us are probably pretty familiar with his story. Convinced of his own unwavering loyalty to Jesus, he openly scoffed when Jesus predicted he would deny knowing Him, not just once but three times. And because it’s a familiar story and because (spoiler alert!) everything Jesus says is right, we know that’s precisely what Peter did. Upon Jesus’s apprehension, the Bible tells us that Peter was so eager to distance (and save) himself, he denied Jesus simply (verse 70), he adamantly denied knowing Jesus (verse 72), and he even threw in a few swears and curses to make it abundantly clear he was in no way associated with that King of the Jews guy (verse 74).

And at the sake of being repetitive here, y’all, we do this, too! Like Peter, we are so eager to prove our likeness to those around us, to do whatever necessary to avoid being excluded or “unfriended” that we, too, adopt behaviors we might have once sworn we’d never do. Peter, like his friend Judas (and like us), sold out his Savior because he was caught in a desperate desire to separate himself from the taunting, the whispering, the persecution, the shunning that can sometimes come from being close-knit with Jesus. Peter wanted to stay free. Peter wanted to stay alive. Peter wanted to save himself in the face of the popular crowd, and he sold Jesus out in an effort to do so. Ouch. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Being a “Jesus freak” is all fine and good and cool…until it’s not.

But like Peter’s, our story doesn’t need to end at our sell-outs. Friends, Jesus knew what Peter was going to do ahead of time, remember? Notice how He kept Peter around, nurturing His relationship with him anyway. In fact, Jesus was so not mad at Peter that after rising from the dead, Jesus chose to meet one-on-one with Peter, taking time just for him. I once heard a pastor say that had Judas asked for (and accepted) forgiveness instead of killing himself out of shame, he, too, would have been welcomed back into the fold of Jesus. Because I know the character of Jesus, I truly believe that’s 100% accurate. And it probably would’ve happened with no questions asked.

My dears, our God is a God of compassion, a God of love, and because of those dominate traits, He’s also a God of forgiveness. By zero accident, if we rewind back before Judas’s betrayal, back before Peter’s denial, all the way to Matthew 18, we’ll happen upon a VERY interesting conversation (hindsight being 20/20 and all that). Our old buddy Peter asks Jesus about this topic, which he’ll come to experience so personally. “Lord, how many times will my brother sin against me and I forgive him and let it go? Up to seven times?” (verse 21)

Consider how much like Peter we are, even here. He’s interested in doing the right thing. He’s actually seeking Jesus for guidance, and he’s even stretching himself into forgiving this same repeat-offender of a friend seven whole times. I feel like he’s kind of expecting Jesus to say, “Wow, Peter, look how kind and forgiving and awesome you are!” but instead, Jesus replies, “I say to you, not up to seven times, but seventy times seven” (verse 22). Not that I don’t feel his pain, but I get kind of tickled picturing what must have been Peter’s speechless jaw-drop at Jesus’s exceedingly high expectation of forgiveness. This exchange between Peter and Jesus, however, served to teach Peter (and us) a much larger lesson than some simple multiplication.

Return now to Peter’s epic screw-up, his selling-out of Jesus. It’s obvious he’s aware of his sin, but it’s also clear by his actions afterward that Peter believed Jesus was a master of forgiveness. He had seen it, and he was now personally experiencing it in a magnificent way. Friends, you and I serve this same Jesus. He loves you! He is anxiously awaiting the chance to forgive whatever sin you and I have committed so as to eradicate ANYTHING standing between us and Him. Listen carefully: you have never done anything nor could you ever do anything bad enough that Jesus can’t/won’t forgive you. He wants desperately to spend time with you, just the two of you, because it’s so often during those purposeful moments that you’ll get the outer noise quieted down enough to hear Jesus’s love-filled whisper: It’s okay. You might have messed up, but I forgive you. I love you.

Dear Lord, thank You for sharing with me the stories of both Peter and Judas. Thank You, Father, that I can come to You, ask sincerely and with a repentant heart for Your forgiveness, and You will remember my screw-up no more. Thank You for loving me exactly as I am. Thank You that Your compassion never fails, and I am never too far gone for Your reach. I’m sorry for times, both intentional and unintentional, when, like Judas and Peter, I’ve sold You out for the things of this world. Help me, Father, to be more concerned about pleasing You than others. I love You, and I am so grateful to serve a God so full of second (and third and fourth and fifth) chances. May I never ever take Your forgiveness for granted. It’s in Jesus’s name I pray. Amen.

 

 

How To Be Miserable

Full disclosure: I have been struggling with my attitude lately. With the recent start of school, we have faced some new challenges, and because they seem so large to my limited thinking, I’ve let myself get consumed by them at times. Per His usual, however, God has been making this trying time work for my good by helping me see how crucial time spent with Him in prayer is, and He’s leading me into losing more of my focus on myself (man, I am SO SLOW at this lesson!!!).

Recently I was listening to a Joyce Meyer sermon (Y’all, if you don’t already know, she has a FREE app with radio shows, full sermons with video, various resources, etc. GET. IT.), and she was teaching on the dangers of being so caught up in ourselves, specifically the dangers of self-centeredness. This really struck me because I wouldn’t describe myself as self-centered. But you know what? I am! I focus on myself, on my life, on my problems, and on my wishes a lot. A whole lot. Even an embarrassing amount at times. Through this sermon I really felt God pressing upon my heart the necessity of getting outside my own feelings and my own mind. I felt Him encouraging me to stop ruminating on my problems. Ephesians 5:15 says, “So be careful how you live. Don’t live like fools, but like those who are wise.” Praising God is wise. Celebrating His work in my life is wise. Pushing my emotions to the side and not allowing them to dictate how I’m going to go through my day or my life is wise. Keeping my mind stayed on God, the fixer of all my problems, is wise. Allowing my circumstances and my emotions to determine my course for the day/the week/the month? Very, very unwise. And even more importantly, it’s not just unwise, it’s sinful!

So, after listening to this sermon, I broke out my pen and paper to write down a little good-humored list that Mrs. Joyce gave during her teachings. No matter what’s going on in my life, I can usually (and unfortunately) find myself doing at least one of these things. Even on days when things are going well, I find that this list is a great reminder of what to avoid so that I can be the best me and share God more vividly with others I come in contact with throughout the day. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. (Prayer is below list.) So without further ado…

HOW TO BE MISERABLE (By Joyce Meyer)

*Think about yourself constantly.

*Use “I” as often as possible.

*Mirror yourself continually by the opinion of other people.

*Listen greedily to what other people say about you, and if it’s not what you want to hear, get angry.

*Expect to be appreciated by everyone.

*Be suspicious.

*Be jealous and envious.

*Be sensitive and easily offended.

*Never forgive criticism.

*Trust nobody but yourself.

*Insist on respect and consideration at all times.

*Demand agreement with your own views on everything.

*Sulk and feel sorry for yourself if people are not grateful to you for what you do for them.

*Never forget how much you’ve done for other people; think about it at all times….BUT, always remember what they have failed to do for you.

*Shirk your duty and seek at all times to entertain yourself, and do as little as you possibly can for other people.

Dear Lord, I see myself so much in this list above. I am so thankful, though, that I can come to You for help in getting over myself and that You always hear my prayer. Gently guide me, Father, so that I might be able to lose my grip on my own self-centeredness. I know that when I’m focused only on my life and my wants and needs I’m less useful to You. Help me to see those times when my focus needs to change, Lord, and help me be immediately obedient to You when You point those out. I love You, Lord, and I am so grateful to be Yours. Help THAT to be my focus, even when things are challenging and upsetting. Help me to keep my mind stayed on You; give me an attitude of gratitude, Lord. Thank You for the life I live, for my many, many blessings, and thank You for teaching me how to better serve You. I offer this prayer in the mighty name of Jesus. Amen.