Plant Killer

“Hi, my name is Lindsey, and I’m a plant killer.”

{mumbled group response}: “Hi, Lindsey.”

So, is “black thumb” a thing? If it is, I have it. Maybe it’s not “black thumb.” Maybe it’s “dead thumb”? “Shriveled-to-actual-dust thumb”? Anyway, whatever the thumb that I have, it’s apparently not going anywhere. Roses left in my care? Dead. Plants given to me with the promise that I can’t kill them? Ha! Give me seven to ten days and watch the magic. And don’t get me started on my venture into fall-inspired mum-dom. That mum was full and beautiful and yellow, and I killed it. I don’t get it because I did exactly what the less-than-specific tag said!  I watered it. (Did I over-water it? Likely. Did I water it too little? Also possible.) I even nurturingly pruned it ON THE REGULAR, taking time to carefully snap off the dead blooms so that new, healthy ones could grow up in their places. Did it help? Did my mum grow big and beautiful and glorious like my neighbor’s from across the street? Negative, Ghost Rider. See what I mean. You know, I’m thinking “dead thumb” might be most accurate.

Given my pruning skills–or lack thereof, for the ten-thousandth time I’m reminded of how fortunate we all are that I’m not God (can I get an AMEN?!). That promise of “beauty for ashes” would’ve clearly been DOA. As it turns out, the Bible confirms for us that God is, in fact, a VERY “green thumb.” Check out Jesus’s words from John 15: 1-2. “I am the True Vine, and My Father is the Vinedresser. Any branch in Me that does not bear fruit He cuts away (trims off, takes away); and He cleanses and repeatedly prunes every branch that continues to bear fruit, to make it bear more and richer and more excellent fruit” (AMP). Look at all that life and pruning and growth–no dead mums anywhere!

A few short years ago, I knew absolutely zero about process mentioned in the verse above that God puts us through during the growth and development in our walk with Him. I didn’t know it existed; I didn’t know its name (sanctification). I recognized that God was working on me. I noticed that every time I experienced issues within my life, instructions for how to overcome those exact struggles suddenly appeared within my readings of the Word and/or my devotionals. It was too often and too dead-on not to be God at work on and within me, but I didn’t know it had a name. I had never heard the term sanctification. I had never heard a sermon on it, never read a book about it, never discussed it in small groups or Sunday school classes. But you know how once you hear a word you’ve never heard before it’s suddenly everywhere and being used by everyone? This is how the concept of sanctification was for me. That term showed up in Bible verse after Bible verse, scripture lesson after scripture lesson.

In an effort to shed brighter light on this process in which God plucks off our non-fruit-bearing parts in order for growth and healthier fruit to bloom, let’s turn (yet again) to my dear friend Joyce Meyer (some might even call us BFF’s). In her book How to Succeed at Being Yourself, Ms. Joyce explains sanctification as, “the state of perfect holiness, reached by degrees through the work of the Holy Spirit in our lives” (pg. 254).

There are a couple of very important take-aways from her definition that, to me, help make this unfamiliar term a little more understandable. 1) Our end-goal is holiness.  2)We will never reach holiness all at once. It requires lots and lots of tiny steps (by degrees) in the right direction. 3) Most importantly, we cannot be sanctified of our own doing. The pruning of our destructive areas, our dead areas, MUST be done by God via His Holy Spirit.

Just to show you how important and essential to our spiritual maturity this process is, I want to provide for you several pieces of scripture where God speaks to us about it. I’m sorry to be list-y (ten points to Lindsey for excellent word creation!), but I truly believe that seeing and reading these verses will help God speak to you about this process so that you can better identify it and allow it fully into your own walk with Him.

Let’s begin with Leviticus 19:2, because, in my opinion, it truly explains WHY we need to go through this sometimes-uncomfortable process. “Be holy, because I, the Lord your God, am holy.” Surely this is clear enough. Our job as a child of God is to become more and more and more like Him, to strip off those things that encumber us, those sins that entangle us, that hinder us from preaching His message to those unsaved and unfamiliar with Jesus (Hebrews 12:1). If we keep all of our human faults, all of our “dead blooms” then this becomes impossible. As we learned from the Joyce Meyer definition earlier, our end-goal is holiness. Thus sayeth the Lord.

But of course God doesn’t just mention sanctification one time and hope we understand its necessity and importance. In 2 Thessalonians 2:13 it states, “…God from the beginning chose you for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and belief in truth.” Back up a little to 1 Thessalonians 5:23 and you’ll find this: “And may the God of peace Himself sanctify you through and through [separate you from profane things, make you pure and wholly consecrated to God].” Again and again, our Heavenly Father reminds us that sanctification is something we all must go through, that it’s something only He can initiate and complete within us, that we must allow this process to occur so we might become more like Him. “Sanctify them by the Truth; Your Word is Truth. As You have sent Me into the world, I also have sent them into the world. I sanctify Myself for them, so that they also may be sanctified by the Truth” (John 17: 17-19).

The final scripture I want us to look at is Joshua 7:12-13, where God speaks to Joshua about the necessity of personal sanctification and the very real distance and danger we let into our lives when we aren’t constantly working WITH GOD toward great holiness. “I will cease to be with you, unless you destroy the accursed things among you. Up, sanctify (set apart for a holy purpose) the people, and say, Sanctify yourselves for tomorrow; for those says the Lord, the God of Israel: There are accursed things in the midst of you…You cannot stand before your enemies until you take away from among you the things devoted [to destruction].” Okay, so maybe you and I aren’t standing before golden idols as were those who this scripture references. However, you and I have PLENTY of strongholds: destructive habits that lead to our demise and keep us separated from God. And careful reading of this portion of Joshua 7 makes it very clear that not only do strongholds make us vulnerable to Satan and his attacks, but they make it impossible for God to draw near to us. I don’t know about y’all, but that is the OPPOSITE of how I want my life and my relationship with God to go! I want ZERO to do with Satan and his lies. I want EVERYTHING to do with Jesus. If that’s my true desire, there’s only one way to make that happen: sanctification via the Holy Spirit.

Chances are good that at least one of you reading this has had or is about to have a thought like this: well I don’t really think there’s any area that I need to work on right now because God’s not really pointed one out. To that I can only reply: GET BEHIND ME, SATAN! With all due respect, that’s the enemy talking to you and through you, friend. How do I know? Because you’re not holy. Relax, I’m not saying I am or others are either. None of us are…hence the need for personal sanctification in our lives. Prayerfully consider these areas in your life where God might be urging you to loosen some strongholds:

*Pride                       *Unforgiveness             *Hate/Prejudice/Racism

*Anger                      *Judgment                     *Worry/Fear

*Bitterness               *Selfishness                   *Doubt

*Worldliness           *Addiction (of all kinds)

And, y’all, this is just a very general list. It’s not person specific. God, however, is very individual. When He addresses issues with you that need work, He’s not going to give you a broad category. He’s going to be very, very specific to your behaviors, your beliefs, your strongholds.

Friends, our goal is progress; it is not perfection. Yes, holiness is what we’re straining toward, but we know we can’t reach that while here on this earth. But. We can get better. We can improve. We can work hard on ourselves, letting the Holy Spirit minister to us by pruning off those dead blooms. We can’t do it alone, and honestly, we don’t want to. We like comfort, and boy, sanctification is NOT comfortable. It does, however, bring us closer to Jesus, the same Jesus who promises to uphold us and walk hand-in-hand with us. The same Jesus, also, who restores to us, in degrees, everything that Satan steals from us.

It’s understandable to ask ‘why bother working so hard to rid my life of this stronghold or that stronghold when I know I have 12 more to address once it’s better controlled?’ but as with everything else, the answer is simply JESUS. Think about it like this: each stronghold is a wall, an opaque barrier between you and Jesus and all the good God has in store for your life. With each conquered stronghold (Romans 8:37), your mind gets stronger, your heart gets stronger, your earthly relationships get stronger, and most importantly, your relationship with Jesus and your testimony as a Christian gets stronger. While studying this subject, I came to understand something crucial: when we tear down in the name of Jesus the walls put up by our strongholds that stand between us and Jesus, it creates the opportunity for Jesus to re-erect those walls, instead, between us and Satan, protecting us further from the lies and schemes of the enemy.

Maybe you don’t feel like you’re currently working on yourself in any way in response to God’s process of sanctification. Maybe you feel like God hasn’t spoken to you so you’re good. Again, I don’t mean this like it probably sounds (although, I kind of do) but you are absolutely wrong. God is right there. He doesn’t teach us time and time again in His Word about the need for Holy-Spirit-led sanctification in our lives only to sit back and wait for us to do it ourselves. As He patiently reminds us, it requires the Holy Spirit, and more often than not, the Holy Spirit doesn’t yell. Being the wonderful, loving, provisional God that He is, tucked in Psalms is a portion of scripture that directly addresses what we’re talking about. If you know you need God’s sanctification in your life but you’re not sure how to even begin that process, adopt this scripture as your prayer (I’ve gotten you started below). God is waiting. God’s blessings are waiting. And Satan is REALLY hoping you won’t be brave enough to begin.

Holy Father, thank You so very much for loving me too much to leave me as I am. Thank You that I can grow and mature in my walk with You, that I don’t have to stay bound to these strongholds any longer. Father, I know that there are areas in my life where I desperately need the guidance of the Holy Spirit so that I might untangle myself from the enemy’s lies and strengthen my relationship with You. Just like it says in Your Word, Lord, search me and know my heart. Point out anything in me that offends You, and lead me along the path of everlasting life. Help me not to hear those lies of the enemy, the ones that tell me I’m fine like I am and the fault lies with others. I want to take responsibility for eradicating unfruitful areas of my life, Jesus, and I know I need You to help me make that happen. I thank You for hearing my prayer. Be with me, sanctify me, and help me become what You have designed me to be. It’s in Your holy name that I pray, Jesus. Amen.

 

How To Be Miserable

Full disclosure: I have been struggling with my attitude lately. With the recent start of school, we have faced some new challenges, and because they seem so large to my limited thinking, I’ve let myself get consumed by them at times. Per His usual, however, God has been making this trying time work for my good by helping me see how crucial time spent with Him in prayer is, and He’s leading me into losing more of my focus on myself (man, I am SO SLOW at this lesson!!!).

Recently I was listening to a Joyce Meyer sermon (Y’all, if you don’t already know, she has a FREE app with radio shows, full sermons with video, various resources, etc. GET. IT.), and she was teaching on the dangers of being so caught up in ourselves, specifically the dangers of self-centeredness. This really struck me because I wouldn’t describe myself as self-centered. But you know what? I am! I focus on myself, on my life, on my problems, and on my wishes a lot. A whole lot. Even an embarrassing amount at times. Through this sermon I really felt God pressing upon my heart the necessity of getting outside my own feelings and my own mind. I felt Him encouraging me to stop ruminating on my problems. Ephesians 5:15 says, “So be careful how you live. Don’t live like fools, but like those who are wise.” Praising God is wise. Celebrating His work in my life is wise. Pushing my emotions to the side and not allowing them to dictate how I’m going to go through my day or my life is wise. Keeping my mind stayed on God, the fixer of all my problems, is wise. Allowing my circumstances and my emotions to determine my course for the day/the week/the month? Very, very unwise. And even more importantly, it’s not just unwise, it’s sinful!

So, after listening to this sermon, I broke out my pen and paper to write down a little good-humored list that Mrs. Joyce gave during her teachings. No matter what’s going on in my life, I can usually (and unfortunately) find myself doing at least one of these things. Even on days when things are going well, I find that this list is a great reminder of what to avoid so that I can be the best me and share God more vividly with others I come in contact with throughout the day. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. (Prayer is below list.) So without further ado…

HOW TO BE MISERABLE (By Joyce Meyer)

*Think about yourself constantly.

*Use “I” as often as possible.

*Mirror yourself continually by the opinion of other people.

*Listen greedily to what other people say about you, and if it’s not what you want to hear, get angry.

*Expect to be appreciated by everyone.

*Be suspicious.

*Be jealous and envious.

*Be sensitive and easily offended.

*Never forgive criticism.

*Trust nobody but yourself.

*Insist on respect and consideration at all times.

*Demand agreement with your own views on everything.

*Sulk and feel sorry for yourself if people are not grateful to you for what you do for them.

*Never forget how much you’ve done for other people; think about it at all times….BUT, always remember what they have failed to do for you.

*Shirk your duty and seek at all times to entertain yourself, and do as little as you possibly can for other people.

Dear Lord, I see myself so much in this list above. I am so thankful, though, that I can come to You for help in getting over myself and that You always hear my prayer. Gently guide me, Father, so that I might be able to lose my grip on my own self-centeredness. I know that when I’m focused only on my life and my wants and needs I’m less useful to You. Help me to see those times when my focus needs to change, Lord, and help me be immediately obedient to You when You point those out. I love You, Lord, and I am so grateful to be Yours. Help THAT to be my focus, even when things are challenging and upsetting. Help me to keep my mind stayed on You; give me an attitude of gratitude, Lord. Thank You for the life I live, for my many, many blessings, and thank You for teaching me how to better serve You. I offer this prayer in the mighty name of Jesus. Amen.

 

Put On Your Jesus Clothes

Turns out I’m a liar. Not an intentional one, mind you, but a liar all the same. At the close of the last blog post (part one about the resurrection of Lazarus), I told you that I’d have part two ready for you soon. Ha! Clearly four weeks later isn’t soon. In my defense, my only child did start kindergarten last week, so surely that buys me some good graces and extra time, right?? At the end of last week I mentioned something about really needing to get my blog completed, and my sweet child said, “Oh wow, you still haven’t written that yet? Part one was a long time ago!” Such an encourager.

So, in keeping with my long-ago issued promise, let me provide for you a part two. But first, let’s have a quick review since it’s been so long and so much life has happened you probably totally forgot I even write a blog. (Back to school shopping anyone? Start of new morning routines, yes? Heart palpitations and tears? No one else? Just me? Okay, great.)

As we left off in the post entitled “Don’t Get Fooled By The Stink,” we saw that Jesus fulfilled His promise to Mary and Martha by resurrecting their brother Lazarus four days after he was declared dead and subsequently buried. We discussed how important it is for us, as Christians, to maintain our faith in what God’s doing for us and in our lives, no matter how dead something seems. To us we might see our marriage as dead or our will-power as dead or our ambition or our job or our creativity as dead, but Jesus is the Resurrection. In John 11 we are reminded that NOTHING it too dead that Jesus can’t heal it and restore it, better than it ever was before.

But our story of Jesus breathing life back into Lazarus doesn’t end there. It doesn’t stop with his reminder to Martha that nothing is impossible for Him (John 11:40). For this second half, this final portion of the story, I want us to start with John 11:41-43. As is His usual, Jesus sets the example for us in how to approach any situation into which we need God’s divine intervention: He starts with prayer. He lifts His eyes, lifts His hands, and thanks His Father for listening even before a single action has been taken, before any stirring in the grave had begun. While this isn’t the main focus in this post, I’d hate for us to pass up the lesson here. How often do we begin praying with just a list of demands we’re bringing before God? How about instead of that, we start with thanking Him? I say we should get all manner of wild and crazy and even thank Him for answering our prayer before we ever even see any change! What?! I know, pretty wild. Consider what kind of faith that displays before God. And even better than that, it focuses us on worshiping Him, on recognizing His mightiness and His glory without our need to see Him “perform” first. More God, less selfish ambition. Such a simple yet excellent example.

Let’s get Brother Laz outta that grave, though, shall we? In John 11:43 it happens. The verse tells us that after Jesus prays, “He shouted with a loud voice, Lazarus, come out!” Bet you can’t guess what happens next…“And out walked the man who had been dead, his hands and his feet wrapped in burial cloths (linen strips), and with a [burial] napkin bound around his face. Jesus said to them, Take off the grave clothes and let him go.” Okay, so we have officially made it to part two, our next step. Yes, we must thankfully and prayerfully submit our seemingly dead areas to Jesus, allowing Him to do what no other can. Yes, we must trust while we wait. But then. Then, when we see that He’s answered our prayer, that our formerly dead relationship/self-worth/career/hope has been resurrected, we must go one more step toward the land of the living and take off our grave clothes.

You’re right; our grave clothes don’t look like Lazarus’s. In place of the burial linens that, for Lazarus, symbolized his once-dead existence, we have negative qualities and emotions. We often wrap ourselves in those negative emotions during those  days/months/years we spend nursing our dead/dying circumstances, and sometimes, even once we walk out of those metaphorical graves, we keep those grave clothes with us. Jesus tells us, just like He’s instructing Lazarus, to take off those grave clothes.

What do our “grave clothes” look like, you ask? It’s pretty simple. We are wrapped for dead in those qualities and emotions that we incorrectly believe shield us, that we incorrectly believe protect us from more hurt, more disappointment. See if any of these sound familiar to you:

*Anger               *Bitterness                 *Rejection               *Shame

*Hurt                 *Guilt                           *Unforgiveness      *Distrust

*Worry              *Disbelief/Doubt       *Addiction               *Distractions

*Negativity/Pessimism                         *Isolation                *Hate

So what’s the truth? Do you see any of these “grave clothes” in your own life? While it doesn’t say this directly in the Bible, I feel pretty confident that Jesus didn’t resurrect Lazarus so he could walk this earth in misery, spreading his rejection (he literally died after all!), his bitterness, and his anger over how things turned out. There’s just no way that God has that plan in place for us, either.

So now what? If you aren’t dead anymore but you can’t wear those same negative emotions anymore, then what? Well, we get purposeful. We start thinking about what our lives should look like, what our attitudes should be like now that we’ve been saved (yet again!) by the grace of God. PUT ON YOUR JESUS CLOTHES, PEOPLE! Romans 13:14 states that, instead of living in the dark (or the dead), we should, “clothe [ourselves] with the Lord Jesus Christ.” Get rid of those stinky, moldy grave clothes and put on some Jesus clothes. That sounds great, but what exactly do these Jesus clothes look like, and where do we get them?

Throughout the Bible you’ll find example after example of Jesus’s own interactions with others, showing us how we should treat people, the ones we like and the ones we would rather not even look at. But for me, Colossians 3:12-13 provides a simple list of the characteristics of Jesus we should be wearing daily. It reads, “Since God chose you to be the holy people He loves, you must clothe yourselves with tenderhearted mercy, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience. Make allowance for each other’s faults, and forgive anyone who offends you.” Maybe we could collectively decide that this list, along with the addition of a few more such as joy, gratitude, compassion, trust, and love is a pretty full wardrobe of Jesus clothes.

And, of course, that other question, where do we get these Jesus clothes, pretty much answers itself: Jesus. Y’all, we aren’t miracle workers. We get hurt and angry and bitter, and despite a desire to change those feelings, we just can’t get past them. So instead of deciding that you’ve been hurt and this is just how you are now, or you’ve been rejected and now you’ll never be loved again, how about we spend some time talking to the single most qualified person to help us clothe ourselves in a way that blesses our lives, the lives of those near us, and that glorifies the Savior who brought new life into our mess in the first place. This world and its issues cannot be handled without prayer. No relationship can be sustained, no body controlled without the help of Jesus. (Did you catch that? You literally CANNOT DO LIFE without prayer!) Yes, Jesus showed up for you (or will show up, if you’re still praying), but it’s our jobs to sustain that new life He’s given our dead areas. It’s up to us, now. It’s time to take off those grave clothes, pray to our Resurrector and Savior for His help throwing off all our old garb, and put on our Jesus clothes (Ephesians 4:22-24).

Yeah, okay, so maybe they’re a little scratchy, a little tight, a little uncomfortable at first. Hang in there. It may not be fast and it may not be easy, but those Jesus clothes will feel like years-old sweats in no time, and I can PROMISE you, no matter how long you wear them, you’ll NEVER be able to say that about those grave clothes. Friends, it’s time for an outfit change, don’t you think? I’m pretty sure that other one is starting to smell.

Dear Lord, as Jesus taught me to pray, thank You in advance for hearing my prayer, for always hearing my prayers. I ask, Lord, that You help me to throw off my grave clothes and clothe myself in You. I continue to pray that You breathe life into any dead areas in my life, just like You did for Lazarus, and I ask for help throwing off those negative emotions that might cling to me because of those areas. Help me to successfully trade those for the qualities of You, Jesus, so that I can glorify You with how I live my life. I want others to see what You mercifully did for me, to see that change in my life and my attitude as well, and to recognize that it can only have come from You. Thank You, Father, that in my weakness I can come to You, be made new, and have my “clothes” completely transformed. I love You, God, and I worship Your greatness and love. It’s in Jesus’s name that I ask these things. Amen.

(1 Samuel 2: 16) So stand still and see this great thing the Lord will do before your eyes now.

 

Don’t Be Fooled By The Stink

I feel like I have started off multiple blog posts by saying something like, “let’s try a little experiment,” and yet, here I am doing it again. (I am obviously incredibly spontaneous and creative.) Over the last few weeks, I have been mentally wrestling with the Bible story I’ve felt God leading me to address and the specific points within it that I hoped to make. I had too much I felt I needed to discuss; a good problem to have, but with a story that spans more than 45 verses, it was clear I had to figure out a more reader-friendly approach. CALM DOWN. I came up with a solution. I mean, who has time to read 45 Bible verses when all those unseen Facebook posts await, am I right?! (insert good-natured eye-roll emoji here)

In this post, I’d love for us to spend some time going over the story of Jesus resurrecting his good friend Lazarus, which can be found in John 11. So in order for us to dig deeper into the goodness of these scriptures, we’ll consider today a “Part 1” if you will, with “Part 2” to follow soon. Sound okay? As I told you…I’m super creative.

At the risk of repeating a story many of you already know, let me take a quick second and summarize our main characters and the situation taking place as we enter the 11th chapter of John.

We are back with our friends Mary (of feet-washing-with-her-hair fame) and Martha (of griping-about-her-sister-not-helping-in-the-kitchen fame), and they are urgently reaching out to their dear friend Jesus, asking for his healing help for their dying brother Lazarus. Because Lazarus is literally on his deathbed and because Jesus is the Messiah and because they are all three very dear to Jesus’s heart, they contact him for his help, fully expecting his immediate arrival and subsequent answering of prayer.

Verse four tells us, “When Jesus received the message, He said, ‘This sickness is not to end in death; but [on the contrary] it is to honor God and to promote His glory, that the Son of God may be glorified through (by) it.'” (Side note: Have a seriously sick friend? Are you dealing with a scary, challenging illness? This is a FABULOUS scripture to pray over it!) Now to me, this sounds exactly what I would expect Jesus to say. I mean, after all, his dear friends have reached out to him, asking for his healing, which he can easily give, and it’s all in an effort to save someone very special to him. I read a reply like that and think yep, Jesus has got this. But wait! In verse 6, it clearly says that although Jesus was aware this was a dire situation, he still remained TWO DAYS longer in the place where he was. Do what?! WHY???? Maybe Jesus knows something we don’t? (Um, yes, always true.) Maybe ole Laz isn’t quite as sick as his over-reactive sisters made it seem? Sadly, no. In fact, it was serious. It was VERY serious. “So then Jesus told them [the disciples] plainly, Lazarus is dead” (vs. 14).

Unfortunately, I know exactly how Mary and Martha must feel. They had been faithfully praying and praying for God to hear them, for Jesus to show up and heal, to prevent the death that was getting more and more eminent. And yet nothing. No arrival of Jesus. No healing of Lazarus. Only death, with its dark cloak and sharp scythe appeared at the door of their dusty home.

I’m guessing I’m not the only one who knows what this feels like…to watch things within our lives that once were so full of life, so healthy, wither and practically die. Let me tenderly ask you today, because man does this subject often hurt, what in your life has that look of death, that feeling of hopelessness? Let me guess…

*your health?                *your marriage?               *your ambition?

*your career?                *a particular relationship or friendship?

*your self-worth?         *your will power/self-control?

*your relationship with God?               *God’s favor over you/your life?

*your future?                *a particular dream you’d held onto for years?

*your will to live?

Friends, Lazarus was IN THE GRAVE dead when Jesus finally arrived. In fact, he was so very dead (four days dead…with ZERO embalming fluid, might I add) that when Jesus approached Lazarus’s grave, which was basically a cave with boulder against the entrance, and demanded that the stone be rolled aside, the Bible says “Martha…exclaimed But Lord, by this time he [is decaying and] throws off an offensive odor…” (vs. 39). In all her grief and upset, Martha is so aware of the finality of her brother’s condition that she warns Jesus: What are you thinking, Lord? He’s gonna stink so bad! Amen, girl! This sounds like some common sense I can get behind.

What is your marriage, your career, your self-worth smelling like these days? Are you convinced that Jesus didn’t get there in time to save whatever it is you’ve been begging him to heal for so long? Mary and Martha felt just as you do, as I have. You’re too late, Jesus. I cried out to you, and you delayed getting here and now look! I’m too sick. The love between my husband and I is too far gone. My current circumstances have completely killed my dreams and plans. You’re too late, Jesus. It’s dead.

Y’all there is NEVER an absence of hope, of possibility, when it’s Jesus who’s in charge. You and I? We are Mary and Martha. We can pray all day and beg and plead, but ultimately, we have no power within ourselves. We can’t heal, and for those circumstances having already crossed over into the grave, we certainly have no ability to resurrect. But let me hook you up with someone who does. When you and I allow Jesus to handle our dying parts in His way, with His power, He fixes things that we swore could NEVER be fixed.

“Jesus said to her, I am [Myself] the Resurrection and the Life…” (vs 25). What in your life desperately needs The Resurrection HIMSELF? You see, for us, things look dead. For us, things even smell dead. But for Jesus, death is no big deal. He’s already overcome it. How can Jesus, who mastered death and for whom death holds no power, be limited by it? He. Isn’t. He. Cannot. Be. Don’t stop praying and expecting! Don’t stop taking to Him your marriage or your career or your zest for life simply because in your human weakness you have decided it’s past the point of help. Lazarus was dead for four solid days. He was buried and starting to literally stink. His skin would have been beginning to decay. But then Jesus arrived. Mighty, mighty Jesus. And he simply spoke, “He shouted with a loud voice, Lazarus, come out!” and out walked Lazarus (vs 43-44). Whatever you think is dead and buried, friends, it is not. There is nothing too far gone for The Resurrection Himself to breathe life back into.

And for those of you going through something like this, I’m sure you’re feeling hurt and frustrated and confused about why God is even allowing something like this to happen to you, to your family, to your body in the first place. Mary and Martha certainly were. When my marriage was all but dead despite our praying and our counseling and our trying (see previous post), I felt so abandoned. I felt like God had turned His head and His ear; I felt like, instead of coming to help in response to my urgent requests, He was staying those extra couple of days where He was, just letting death win. But He wasn’t. He just wasn’t on my schedule, and Satan used that to whisper doubt into my heart and my head. The same was true for Mary and Martha, and the same is true for you.

You probably feel like screaming WHY WOULD HE LET THIS HAPPEN?!, and I get it. I’ve been there. Chances are, I’ll be there again someday. But God knew we’d feel this way. In fact, if you read this Bible story carefully, He even explains Himself to us.

If you look back at verse 15, before Jesus ever leaves to go to Mary and Martha’s, after telling his disciples that Lazarus is already dead, he says to them (and he says to us, too), “And for your sake I am glad that I was not there; it will help you to believe (to trust and rely on Me).” My friends, God is most interested in our relationship with Him. If when we have a problem, we pray, He snaps His fingers and all is set right, we don’t develop much character and we don’t develop a very deep relationship with Him, do we? It would make us happier and it would make our lives easier, or so we think. But you know what? Sometimes God isn’t interested in only affecting you and your family through your challenges.

The Bible tells us that others’ lives were changed when they witnessed Lazarus’s miracle. Mary was changed, no doubt. Martha was changed, for sure. And there’s zero debate that Lazarus was completely changed. But a number of other lives were affected for God as well. “Upon seeing what Jesus had done, many of the Jews who had come with Mary believed in Him” (vs 45). Whether you realize it or not, people are watching you. They’re watching your decisions and your life and your faith. Because you are Jesus’s friend, because you are a joint-heir to the throne of God with Jesus Christ Himself, you are a testimony to His power and His love. Yes, Lazarus was dead. Yes, it appeared Jesus was too late. But God is never late. He’s never without the ability, and He’s always able to use any situation, any circumstance, no matter how stinky it might be, for His glorification. Will you let Him use you? Will you stop declaring a time of death and prepping for a funeral and instead let Him breathe the breath of life back into your life? Keep your faith, friends. Don’t be fooled by the stink.

Dear Lord, thank you so much that I can ALWAYS count on You, that I never have to believe that it’s too late for Your power to work. Father, I bring to You today those parts of my life that I’ve mistakenly declared dead. I ask that You do what only You have the power to do: resurrect them, please. Help me to keep my faith, to trust that You’re at work even when it’s impossible to detect. Use me, Lord, use my life and my situations so that others may witness You and Your goodness and grace. Father, help me to remain patient, to stand firm when challenges and trials don’t get resolved as I’d like. Heal my dead parts, Lord. May all I go through in my life ultimately bring You glory and honor. I love you, God. Thank you for hearing my prayer. It’s in Jesus’s mighty name that it’s offered. Amen. 

 

Go Again

This past Sunday was one of those days where nothing special really happened, but it was a glorious day all the same. It was one of the first weekend days in a while were my little family of three got the whole day to ourselves. We spent the day just playing and spending time together, but it was while we were outside in our “pool” (it’s a 4×4 blow-up kiddie pool that the adult–it only fits one at a time– must vacate if Her Majesty wants to “swim”) that I took a minute to simply praise God and be intentionally thankful. I was thankful for my covered back porch, for my shady backyard, for that $15 kiddie pool that was keeping my feet cool, and I was so overwhelmingly thankful for the sweet girl swimming around in it. My greatest thanks at that moment, however, went up on behalf of the amazing man I get to share my life with. Despite being enamored with all of his muscles, I was somehow able to look past those and think about his character, his heart, and all of the qualities that make him so wonderful. But before I cause you all to throw up in your mouths a little with more syrupy sweetness, let me fast forward. Somewhere between thinking about what a great husband and father Nathan is, I started thinking about what it means to be a godly man. That line of thought had me thinking about a couple of men in the Bible who are either a little less well known, as in one case, or almost too well known, as in the other, and what they have to teach us. So, a little more thinking along those lines, and here we are.

Now, I know that 99.9% of the twelve of you who read these blog posts are female. I know that men in the Scriptures get way more than their fair share of the focus, but bear with me. With Father’s Day right around the corner, it’s worth a deeper look at two men in particular; however, let’s worry less about the gender of these two individuals and more about the lessons they learned, and most importantly, what we can learn from them.

ELIJAH

There are many scriptures and stories in which Elijah is discussed, but for our purposes I want to focus on his story found in 1 Kings 18:41-46. I know this is kind of long, but let’s look at these verses together first.

“41 And Elijah said to Ahab, Go up, eat and drink, for there is the sound of abundance of rain. 42 So Ahab went up to eat and to drink. And Elijah went up to the top of Carmel; and he bowed himself down upon the earth and put his face between his knees. 43 And said to his servant, Go up now and look toward the sea. And he went up and looked and said, There is nothing. Elijah said, Go again seven times. 44 And at the seventh time the servant said, A cloud as small as a man’s hand is arising out of the sea. And Elijah said, Go up, say to Ahab, Hitch your chariot and go down, lest the rain stop you. 45 In a little while, the heavens were black with wind-swept clouds, and there was a great rain. And Ahab went to Jezreel. 46 The hand of the Lord was on Elijah. He girded up his loins and ran before Ahab to the entrance of Jezreel.

I know that the constant “go up, go down” is a little distracting but try not to get bogged down. They’re on Mount Carmel, hence the upward and downward movement, and for our focus, it’s unimportant. We want to zero in on Elijah starting in verse 42. It’s clear that he’s separated himself from the others for the purpose of prayer. We see him bowing reverently before God, and although we don’t know what he asked of God, the following verses make it pretty clear he’s asked for rain. Here’s where Elijah’s behavior becomes so elevated beyond that of what you and I often do. He’s expectant and he has faith that God will bring him rain (that’s even apparent in verse 41). If you’re like me, you’re even good at this yourself sometimes: you go to God, you ask, you expect, you have total faith in His response. But a couple of days pass and still nothing. Around day three of waiting on God, we start backpedaling on our faith, wondering why God’s not answered, berating ourselves for not praying the right words or in the right way, blaming our mistakes for getting between us and that prayer we were so sure God was going to answer. Check out Elijah, though. He sends his servant to go see if it’s raining yet, and the servant comes back, “that’s a negative on the rain, sir.” And Elijah sends the servant again. Nope. And again. Still nothing. SEVEN TIMES Elijah says “Go again” in earnest anticipation before the tiniest cloud appears far out on the horizon, “a cloud as small as a man’s hand” as it’s described in verse 44. Take a second to search the above scripture again for missing details between verses 43 and 44. Surely God left something out, right? Surely there are major details here about what Elijah did every time the servant returned with a potentially discouraging report about Elijah’s as yet unanswered prayer. But there’s nothing missing, is there?

How do you act when you pray expectantly and faithfully for something and God doesn’t deliver it when you think He should? Or in the way you think He should? Y’all, I’m here to tell you I revert back into a baby Christian with toddler-esque emotions. I get irritated and frustrated. I get mad and tearful. I start feeling sorry for myself, wondering why God’s out there answering all these other prayers while mine–WHICH WAS PRAYED IN FAITH, HELLO!–is being ignored or dismissed. I get mouthy and doubtful. Do you recognize these behaviors, too? Elijah does not. At no point does he change his prayerful, respectful positioning. At no point does he get up, start walking and mouthing about how he doesn’t understand why God isn’t answering his prayer when it was prayed so earnestly. He simply maintains his faith, maintains a respectful posture, and he waits. He KNOWS God is faithful. He KNOWS God will answer. He knows that rain is coming, and even when the sky is void of clouds, he continues to rely on faith, not sight.

And would you look at that? Not only did Elijah’s faith earn him that small-as-a-man’s-hand cloud, but verse 45 reports that he got so much rain–such an abundant response from God–that the heavens were black and it poured from the sky. Praise God that His faithfulness doesn’t mirror our own, amen? Praise God that He’s willing to wait on us with love and patience instead of growing angry at us when we trade our faithfulness for doubt because He doesn’t do what we want or think He should. I pray that I grow to be more and more like Elijah, that when I boldly approach the throne of God, I trust Him to answer me. I pray that when I don’t get a reply as quickly as I’d prefer, I’m able to simply tell my spirit, “Go again,” maintaining my faith, my expectancy, and my respectful posturing until that answer, no matter how small it might seem at first, appears on the horizon. Lord, help me to be more like Elijah.

NOAH

While Elijah might not be a biblical figure that you easily remember, I’d be willing to bet that Noah is. Since we were all knee-high to a grasshopper (where did this ridiculous saying come from?) we’ve heard the story about Noah building the enormous ark, his loading up two of every animal and sailing to safety as God flooded the earth. We know that eventually the waters went down, a dove indicated that dry land was indeed available again, and after disembarking, Noah was given the rainbow as a symbol of God’s promise never to destroy the earth by flooding ever again. So, in an effort to avoid repeating all the parts of the story we all already know, how about we talk about the man named Noah? How about we focus on the small details, the ones that so often get overlooked because we’ve all heard the story a million times and know all of it by heart. But do we really?

The story of Noah, a good man who trusted God and believed in God, can be found starting in Genesis 6. If you’ve never really read the story for yourself, if all of your knowledge of Noah is based on children’s books or your 1st grade Sunday school teacher, I highly recommend that you read it for yourself from its original source. I can’t really explain it, but it’s just different when it’s read that way for some reason.

There’s a lot of scripture that covers the story of God choosing Noah, God instructing Noah, Noah building the ark, and the subsequent flooding, water recession, etc. Because of this, I’ll leave the scripture reading up to you, and we’ll spend our time focusing on the details that make Noah a man from whom much can be learned. For example, did you know that while scholars and theologians aren’t in total agreement, they do agree that somewhere around 100 to 120 years passed between when God instructed Noah to build the ark and when it actually began to rain? WAIT, WHAT?! Can you believe that?? Do you know what kind of mess would be happening in my head if I heard  what I believed was a word from God only to have ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY YEARS pass before it came to fruition?! How wise God was that He didn’t choose Lindsey Thomas to build His ark! (Can I get an amen??) Y’all, think about this small, frequently overlooked detail. Think about the faith that this conveys. Noah didn’t get all up in his feelings when he finished that ark and the rain didn’t start. He didn’t get himself convinced two or even fifty years later that he’d misheard God, that he’d fabricated the vision God had given him and the Word He’d placed in his heart. I do NOT handle things this well. I get frustrated and doubtful and impatient. Why is this not part of the ark story when they teach it?

But as remarkable as it is that Noah waited so long to see his contract with God fulfilled, there’s something even more significant that I learned from his story. God said, build an ark. Noah said, okay, I’ll get right on that. And at no point did Noah say, maybe I’ll wait until I see there’s a little rain starting before I totally decide to believe that God’s going to do what He said He’s going to do. Nope, Noah was immediately obedient. Oh how I desire to have that level of immediate obedience in my life! I so often fail at being immediately obedient because I need those first sprinkles for my sight to confirm that God really is doing what His Word says He will. I need to think it over for myself, reason out God’s plan and make sure I’ve ruminated on all aspects of His instructions. And sometimes, more than any other reason for stalling, I need to consider what everyone else would think if I did whatever it is that God’s asking me to do. But not Noah. God said, build an ark because I have a plan. Noah said, yes, God. He didn’t worry that it wasn’t raining. He didn’t worry that his neighbors and friends and family might think that this giant boat he was building under a sunny sky was absolutely insane. God spoke; Noah obeyed. Immediately. Now THAT is worth a Sunday school lesson or two, is it not?

Dear Lord, thank you so much for the examples You have given to us in both Elijah and Noah. They have such strong, long-standing faith, Lord, and I ask that You help me to study Your Word and develop my relationship with You so that I, too, can be an example of unwavering faith and belief. I want to take the time right now, Father, and state that I KNOW You do as You say. I declare that I KNOW You are always faithful. Help me to listen to Your promises and close my ears and my heart and my mind to Satan’s lies. And maybe above all, Lord, I want to be the kind of Christian who is immediately obedient when I hear Your voice. When You speak, Father, I will listen. When You instruct, I will obey…immediately. Thank you for Your patience with me, for continuing to work with me in order to help me develop into a mature believer. Thank you for hearing my prayer, Father. In Jesus’s name I pray this and all my prayers. Amen.

#FixItJesus

You know, I knew it was coming. I knew it was inevitable. I’d seen it happen to many, many people; I knew that no one escaped it. Heck, I’d even seen it happen to my own husband. But even with all that expectation, I was ill-prepared for it to happen to me. And it did happen…just a couple of short weeks ago. It’s a painful, difficult story to tell, so bear with me–

It was a regular day, unremarkable in most ways. Then, everything changed. I thought to myself, is this really happening?? Is that what I think it is?? Despite my ferocious denial, there was no pretending this away. I knew life was never going to be the same because there it was, right in front of my disbelieving face: MY FIRST GRAY HAIR!!! RIP, youthfulness. RIP.

Okay, so maybe I had a slight overreaction (I said slight, dang it!), but feeling insecure about my appearance is certainly nothing new for me. I want to take a minute, though, before going forward and blame this all, all of my insecurities based on appearance, on my friends. Y’all, all my friends crawled out of the same weirdly mutated pool apparently. They’re all vampires who have figured out not only how NOT to age, but they’ve obviously signed some seriously binding contract with the devil that allows them to look BETTER as they get older. What is this nonsense?! In a fun turn of events, they’re all smooth skinned and youthful looking (literally not a single one looks her age–it’s ridiculous!), and I’m saggy and baggy enough for all of us. I mean, if ever a case deserved #FixItJesus, it is this one.

All joking aside, struggling with my self-worth based on my appearance and setting my personal value based on how I felt I looked is something I’ve struggled with my entire life. It’s a stronghold (it’s actually a sin, believe it or not) that God has really been helping me to be loosed of, but full disclosure: I have a long way to go. While you might not struggle to the same extent that I do, I’m guessing that you, too, have felt insecure, not good enough, or less than simply because of your appearance too. That is certainly not a godly way to think and feel, so please join me in trying your very best to begin thinking about yourself as God does.

As it turns out, there’s this great book called the Bible (you might remember my mentioning it before) that helps us understand God and His character, and most importantly for today’s topic, how He feels about us, His creation. In Ephesians 2:10, we are described in one translation as “God’s handiwork,” in another “God’s workmanship,” and in yet another, we are referred to as “God’s masterpiece.” I know you have better things to do than listen to me quote Webster, but just sit tight for a minute. If you look up the word masterpiece, you’ll find that it’s defined as “a person’s greatest piece of work.” Let that sink in for a minute. God made every single thing. All of it. And yet we, not only collectively but each of us individually is His masterpiece. Imagine what it must feel like to have created something you love so much that you’re willing to give up what’s most precious to you for that creation, only to have it picked apart and fussed about and taken for granted. Y’all, I really and truly pray that the next time I start fussing about my thighs or those fun skin-wings that my arms are rapidly growing, I’ll remember instead that every single part of me is a masterpiece made by the God I so love. I pray that that thought stops me in my mental tracks, switching me instantly to gratitude instead of grumbling. After all, the truth is, my God loves me so much that He sent me a message letting me know just how much intentionality went into my being created: “I chose you before I formed you in the womb; I set you apart before you were born” (Jeremiah 1:5 CSB). You were no accident. Your crooked nose? No accident. Your thin lips or balding scalp? Not those either. All of you was on purpose. And all of you was for a purpose.

Yes, you say, I know God loves me and I know that I shouldn’t focus on my appearance, but when I’m around others and I feel like the ugliest one in the room or the heaviest person in the group or the least desirable of all my friends, it hurts and I can’t get past it. First of all, I think it’s important to acknowledge that every single person, no matter how beautiful he or she may be in others’ eyes, has felt insecure over appearance, probably way more often than you think. In fact, just the other day I read an interview with a stunning TV actress who seemed flawless but who admitted that some days she has to remove herself from social media because of how bad it makes her feel about herself, about how she looks. Do what?! Y’all, none of us are immune. That being said, an overly negative mindset full of self-hate is completely wrong and goes against all the Bible tells us should be the focus of the children of God.

In 1 Samuel 16:7, the Bible addresses our human, yet faulty, tendency to place value on our own (and others’) outward appearance, saying, “But the Lord said to Samuel–‘Don’t judge by his appearance…the Lord doesn’t see things the way you see them. People judge by outward appearance but the Lord looks at the heart.'” Oh how wrong we get this…on both counts! We judge ourselves too often based on what’s visible on the outside and we unfortunately pass that useless judgement on to others as well. It’s such a problem for human beings that even Jesus addressed it in John 8:15, “You judge according to human standards [just by what you see]. I do not judge anyone.” So let’s think about this logically: If Jesus isn’t the judge, that means God is, and we’ve already established that God made it clear He’s interested in our hearts, not our looks when passing judgement over the lives of His children. I believe the logical conclusion here is that the only judgement we should be concerned about is from our Heavenly Father AND He cares ZERO about our physical appearance. ZERO! Don’t believe me? Can’t follow my logic? Try this on for size: “Don’t let your beauty consist of outward things…but rather what is inside the heart–the imperishable quality of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is of great worth in God’s sight” (1 Peter 3:3-4). Where’s that mic? I need to drop it.

Look, people, I know we are constantly bombarded by people and companies and products that both directly and indirectly tell us that we’re not good enough as we are, that we won’t be successful without this change, that we aren’t really beautiful unless we look this way. The disease of self-value based on physical appearance that so many of us have contracted, me included, is eating us all alive. Take what I found on statisticbrain.com for example: 91% of women are unhappy enough with their bodies that they resort to dieting. NINETY ONE PERCENT! That’s not the worst part though; 80% of women say the images they see on social media make them feel body-insecure. But we sure don’t put it down and pick up our Bibles do we? Nope. This is no formal study, but I’m guessing we’re all more likely to immediately Google some product or fad diet that we think will help us become more like those images we’ve just poured over instead of putting effort toward changing our thinking so we feel about ourselves more like God does.

Tragically, these women who are so undone by their own appearances (that’d be you and me, friend) are allowing this insecurity and self-loathing to trickle down to our precious girls. On that same site, it stated that 90%–let me repeat that…90%– of 15-17 year old girls desire to change at least one aspect of their physical appearance. How sad God’s heart must be over this. To pour His time and love and purposefulness into our sweet girls (and it’s boys and men, too, let’s not pretend) only for us to teach them that they’re not perfect just as they are. And honestly, I’d like to just tsk-tsk at this, say what a shame it is that these girls feel this way, chalk it up to their moody youthfulness, but I’d be hard pressed to limit myself to only one physical attribute I’d like to change. Their self-disapproval and my own self-disapproval is a slap in the face of the God we claim to love and serve and glorify. Shame on us.

So what do we do? How do we change? How do we fix this mess? First, as we discussed before, I think it’s so very important that you know how God feels about you–what He literally says in His Word–and that you pass that along to your children. When we hear our girls or boys complain about their bodies, when our brains instantly go there about our own bodies, isn’t it pretty simple to just remember that, 1. God loves me and made me on purpose, and 2. God REALLY likes me, just as I am. God doesn’t care if your eyebrows look microbladed. He doesn’t care if the skin under your armpit is bumpy or splotchy (in your face, Dove!). He is completely happy with how He made you, and not one bit of how He formed you was accidental.

The second step, in my opinion, is to know what God says about valuing outward appearance. There are so many verses that encourage us to spend our time focusing inwardly, ensuring that our hearts are right before worrying that our hair looks perfect. The average woman spends 335 hours a year, that’s TWO FULL WEEKS of her year, working on her appearance (Today.com). I cringe thinking about how much time would be represented if women were asked how much time a year they put into strengthening their relationship with God…reading their Bible…spending quiet time in prayer with their Savior. In Joyce Meyer’s book How to Succeed at Being Yourself, she doesn’t mix words over the importance of getting ourselves back into a godly mindset with regard to our thoughts about ourselves: “How we feel about ourselves is a determining factor in our success in life and in relationships.” There’s not a single area of our lives that’s not immediately and negatively affected when we have a poor self-image. Our dreams fail, our spirits fail, our marriages fail, our children fail. And Satan gets a hearty, satisfying laugh. I’m not good at this, y’all, but I desperately want to be. And lucky for us, we serve a God whose grace and mercy are all we need when trying to align our thinking more with His. I absolutely cannot do this alone. But I know that if I study what God says about me, if I bury those scriptural truths down in my heart and I use those to shut up the devil when he presses me to feel unworthy and insecure, I CAN defeat this attitude. I can reconstruct my brain so that my self-worth comes from knowing I was perfect enough AS I AM that Jesus died on the cross for me.

And before I finally shut up, let me say this. Some of you might be on the opposite side of this coin. Maybe you’re beautiful. Maybe you’re successful and athletic and you feel REALLY good about yourself. Good for you–if you put forth the work it requires to be those things, you should be proud of yourself. HOWEVER, you shouldn’t be convinced it was all your doing, and you shouldn’t allow yourself to feel superior or to base your self-worth, despite it being positive, on your appearance either. The Proverbs 31 woman is such a great example because it carefully reminds us all that “Charm is deceptive and beauty does not last but a woman who fears the Lord will be greatly praised” (vs. 30).

Let me reiterate, if you struggle with this in any form, you are not alone. God knew we would and the Bible is filled with scriptures to help us turn to Him for guidance and the renewing of our minds. It won’t happen overnight, and it won’t be something that you pray about once and walk away changed. And moms, a quick, non-judgmental word to you: please, please, please stop criticizing your bodies in front of your daughters. They are your children, they have your DNA, and when their hair or nose or ears or breasts or thighs or whatever turn out to be just like yours, how do you think they’re going to feel about themselves then? God doesn’t focus on our external appearance, and neither should we. Now THAT deserves a #FixItJesus.

Dear Lord, thank you so much that You have crafted me with such precision and with great purposefulness. Father, please forgive me for all of the times that I’ve set my value on such a superficial and fleeting thing as my appearance instead of, like You, valuing what’s internal. God, I ask for your help in changing my thinking; please deliver me from this negative mindset, and help me to see both myself and others as You do. Lord, as your Word says in Romans 12:2, I pray that I stand strongly against copying the behavior and customs of this world, but instead let You transform me into a new person by changing the way that I think about myself. I love you, Lord, and I know that to feel good about myself I must see me as You do, and I’m beyond grateful to be so loved. Help me to share that love with myself and with others. Help me to find balance, Lord, so that I can care about my appearance enough to keep myself healthy and well cared for, but not so much that it becomes priority. I desire to care less about physical training and more about training for godliness (1 Tim. 4:8) so that I might be blessed by You. Thank you for hearing my prayer, Father, for it’s in Jesus’s name that I pray. Amen.

 

The Resurrection

Easter.   The resurrection.

Such a monumental event in the back-story of every Christian. If I’m being honest, trying to write a blog post about what this holiday means or should mean to those of us who consider ourselves Christ followers is intimidating and daunting. On top of my deep desire to convey the great display of love and forgiveness and sacrifice embodied in what this holiday represents, an interest in doing so in a way that’s not “same old” or simply a regurgitation of what we’ve all heard at church year after year makes it seem next to impossible. So, instead of stressing and fretting, I’ve decided to focus on just one of the positive reminders that Jesus’s resurrection creates for us, to keep it short and sweet (you’re welcome, Dad), and  leave the preaching to the pros. 🙂

If you turn in your Bible to Mark 15, you’ll notice that Jesus’s crucifixion and death are very detailed, down to the exact times when each event occurs. It states in verse 25 that it was 9:00 am when the crucifixion and torture began. In verse 33, we’re told that while the taunts and brutality continued, the sky completely darkened–it was noon. Take a second and just imagine what THREE HOURS of pain and torture, both physical and emotional, must have been like. How long those three hours must have felt to the man who was suffering on our behalf.

Then, after six full hours, at 3:00 pm, Mark 15:37 tells us, “Jesus let out a loud cry and breathed his last [breath].” It was over. Or was it?

Spoiler alert from Mark 16: Jesus didn’t stay bruised and broken and dead! Praise be to God, for three days later, Jesus rose from the dead having paid our debt in full, having conquered the grave, having fulfilled God’s promises to us, His children!! CAN I GET AN AMEN??!!

This Easter, I pray the Holy Spirit moves in you in a way that’s never before happened when you hear this story and consider its implications on your life. I pray that you feel Jesus’s love for you when you read about those nails, because with each pounding of that hammer, it was certainly His love for you that kept Him there. I pray that you experience something this Easter that you’ve never experienced before, that God whispers something to your heart and to your soul that heals you and inflames your passion for Him and His Word.

This Easter, consider a little fact that sometimes gets lost in all that happens in those chapters in Mark, in those descriptions and retellings of what our Savior endured. In the miraculous emptiness of the tomb. Friends, consider this great truth: so very much can change in just three short days.

I don’t know what death you’re facing: the death of your marriage, the death of your career, the death of a particular season of your life, the death of your will-power, the death of your motivation, etc. But I want you to think about this: if God completely defeated death for His children (that’s US!) in only three days, imagine what He can deliver you from. Our Jesus went from King to crucified in a few days’ time; then, He went from dead to risen, from hurt to healed, from broken to whole, from buried to being seated at the right hand of God the Father Almighty IN ONLY THREE DAYS. Whatever it is you’re facing, whatever it is in your life that seems on its last leg, breathing its last breath, don’t count it out yet. Easter is a story of hope. Easter is a promise of God’s power bestowed upon our lives. Easter is a reminder that the mighty, mighty power of God, the power that literally made death a non-issue, is the same power available to you today to put toward whatever area you’re desperately trying to revive.

Happy Easter, my friends! Let’s celebrate! Won’t you let this holiest of holidays serve as your reminder that God’s love for YOU is so incredibly big, even death could not contain it. There’s nothing you’re facing, nothing you’ll EVER face, that’s too far gone for God; apply God’s Word to it and watch a resurrection of sorts happen in your very own life.

Father, it is almost too much for words what You did for me that day on Calvary. Because I know You know my heart, I know You understand that overwhelming gratitude there for Your sacrifice, Jesus. Thank you that I do not have to fear death because You have overcome it and I am Yours. Thank you for the reminders You’ve embedded into this Easter story. I pray, Father, that this year Easter and the celebration of it light this world of believers on fire for You. May Your Word affect us all like never before. Thank you for Your might, that I am able to apply it to those dead areas of my life and see life in them again. Help me to always remember that NOTHING is beyond Your ability. I love you, God, and I am so very grateful for the matchless gift of Your Son. It’s in His name that I offer my sincere prayer. Amen.