Jehovah-jireh

I admitted it openly with my first post, and I’m continuing to admit it now: I have NO IDEA what I’m doing with this blog. My formula for deciding what to write about each week is uncomplicated to say the least. I consider all of the various aspects that a relationship with God entails, I pay attention to the struggles in my own life in those areas, and I pray (alone and with Nathan), asking God to guide me not only to the topic He’d most like me to address, but also that He’d speak through me. After a day or two, I usually find myself clearly directed to a new topic. This past week, however, has been very different. While the reception of that last post, “Aggressively Patient,” was luke-warm, I felt like God never really moved me past the topic it discussed: patience and faithful expectation while praying for something long-term. I did feel, however, that maybe God was suggesting I add on to what we’d already discussed. In praying about His plan, I kept coming back to the story of Abraham and Sarah. Theirs is a story that’s been so precious to me for many years, and it’s one that’s served to teach me a multitude of lessons. Hopefully it’s one that for you, does exactly the same.

In October of 2006, Nathan and I decided that it was time to start our family. We’d been praying about it, and we felt like God had helped us get our marriage back on track (see  my post “This Means War” for details on that), and now it was time for us to go forth and multiply. Fast forward to October 1, 2012, the day our sweet baby girl was born, and we saw God’s promise fulfilled to us. Hopefully you caught those date discrepancies. The date that Mission: Make A Baby began–October 2006. The date that Mission: Make A Baby completed: October 2012. Um, hello. That’s SIX YEARS. And you don’t even need your cell phone calculator for that math. So what happened during those six years? A nasty little word that far too many people are experiencing for themselves: infertility.

To put it in a nutshell, our infertility struggle consisted of the following: more doctor’s appointments than we could even begin to count, lots of ultrasounds, lots of tests, a doctor change, lots of medicines, additional doctors added to the “team,” one surgery after an endometriosis diagnosis, lots of confusion, more new doctors, a diagnosis of “unexplained infertility,” lots of shots, LOTS of prayer from us (years!), LOTS of prayer from our families and friends (years!), three unsuccessful IUI procedures, and finally one successful IUI on our fourth–and final–attempt. So that, that’s what we were doing during those six years while we waited on God to fulfill His promise.

I can’t speak for Nathan, but I spent some time during those six years doing some other things, too: doubting, questioning, hurting, believing, doubting again, listening to Satan’s lies, deafening myself to Satan’s lies, worrying…I think you get the picture. Shortly into our infertility process, I came across the story of Abraham and Sarah again. It was a story I’d read before, but reading it as someone praying for a child, as someone who’d been praying long-term without seeing God move, it changed my relationship with God. It changed how I saw God and the power He held to bring about what I was beginning to think was an impossibility.

Before we go forward, I want you to take just a second (play along, friends!) and call to mind that one thing you’ve been praying for and wishing for for the longest. Think about that one request that you’ve found yourself making over and over and over. Keep that long-running prayer in the forefront of your mind; focus on it while we discuss Abraham and Sarah so that you can learn from their mistakes and their example, and apply it to your own attitude toward this seemingly unheard prayer.

We begin learning about these two Biblical giants when their names are still Abram and Sarai. At this time, Abram has been visited by God, who promised him an heir via his wife, Sarai. Despite their advanced age, we see Abram and Sarai fully believing in and trusting God, maybe even to the point of readying their home for the baby that God promised them. Unfortunately, though, this was not quick promise fulfillment. In fact, ten years later, God still has not given them a baby. So, Sarai does what you and I have likely done several times ourselves: she takes matters into her own hands. You see, Sarai’s faith had started to wane. She began to feel doubtful that God would ever do what He’d said He would. She decided that He probably needed her help. How many times have you and I decided that God just really can’t do whatever it is we need Him to do, so we’ll need to step in and do it ourselves? Exactly how well has this gone for you, because for me, it’s NEVER worked out well. No plot twist here–it didn’t go well for Sarai either.

Sarai decided that no matter what, there WOULD be a baby, so she convinced Abram to impregnate her handmaid, Hagar. Her plan worked. Abram became a father, Hagar became a mother, and Sarai became a jealous, bitter woman. Think back to that prayer request you’re still praying over. Have you considered going down a road that God didn’t direct you toward, just because you, too, are feeling uncertain that God can/will show up? Are you currently mid self-fix? Look closely at this part of the story–read it for yourself. Do whatever you have to to remind yourself that God’s solution is the only one that doesn’t result in negative consequences for you, with more problems afterward than those you had when you began. Instead of that baby that Sarai so longed for, she birthed resentment, bitterness, jealousy and heartache. That’s NOT what you’ve been praying for, I feel certain.

{Side note: But you know our God and how He works. He doesn’t get angry with Sarai and snatch away the blessing of a promised child. He doesn’t blame her and condemn her. He loves her, He has mercy on her. So if you’re all too familiar with finding your own solutions instead of waiting on the hand of God, know that you, too, are offered grace from a loving Father who is still very anxious to bless you and answer your prayer request.}

God fully intended to keep His promise to Abram and Sarai, so 25 years after making his first promise to them, He shows up yet again to reaffirm to both Sarai and Abram His promise of an heir. Let me repeat that just in case you missed it–TWENTY-FIVE DADGUM YEARS LATER THEIR PRAYER STILL HASN’T BEEN ANSWERED!!! I don’t know about your timeline, but I felt very impatient and very uncertain after only 6 years! Although their years of waiting weren’t perfect, Abram and Sarai should be commended for simply maintaining their determination as they grew very old waiting on God’s promise to come to fruition.

And that’s what God did…He commended them. Twenty-five years later after initially promising them a child, God not only reaffirms it, but He blesses them both with new names, names that will usher them into their season of receiving and answered prayer. For their continued faith, Abram became Abraham, meaning “father of a multitude,” and Sarai, the very old barren woman became Sarah, “mother of nations.” If you’re unfamiliar with this story, I’m sure its ending won’t surprise you: after 25 years of waiting, Abraham (age 99!) and Sarah (only slightly younger) became parents to that long-awaited heir, Isaac.

So let’s go back to that prayer you’ve been praying for a long time now. Let’s think about what this Biblical story teaches us regarding those hard seasons of waiting.

  1. Nothing is impossible for God. Nothing. Abraham was almost 100 year old. Sarah, who would be expected to carry a child, breastfeed a child, was not much younger. It’s safe to assume that their reproductive systems were long past ripe. But what difference does that make for the One who created those bodies in the first place? Whatever you think is supposedly making your request impossible, whatever you see as the largest roadblock to your answered prayer, remind it who’s boss. Nothing in this world, nothing at all, is too big for its Creator to overcome.
  2. God doesn’t work on our timeline. Second Peter 3:8-9 explains to us that “With God, one day is as good as a thousand years, a thousand years as a day. God isn’t late with his promise as some measure lateness” (MSG). This is SUCH a hard concept for us to grasp because we work on such a limited, human time-table. Those six years I waited for God to bless me with a baby were mere moments to Him. He wasn’t late with His response–He was right on time. Right on His time. And His answer to your prayer will be perfectly timed as well.
  3. God will provide. Not God might provide or God could provide. God WILL provide. During their incredibly long season of waiting, after Sarah had attempted to end their waiting of her own accord, Abraham and Sarah renewed their faith. They began to refer to God as “Jehovah-jireh,” a name that means “the Lord who provides.” That same Lord who provided for them exactly what they needed when they needed it is the Lord you’re praying to today. The Lord who showed up so HUGE for Abraham and Sarah–and throughout the many, many stories of the Bible–is the EXACT. SAME. LORD who is soon going to show up big for you, too. Your Lord is Jehovah-jireh; your Lord WILL provide.

The chances that you’re in the midst of a similar infertility battle as what I faced, what Sarai faced, is pretty slim. But this story isn’t really about infertility–don’t get caught up in that. This story is a warning. It’s a warning about what consequences you can inadvertently bring on yourself and others by choosing to answer your own prayers. That’s not your job. Our job is taking those prayer requests to God, praying sincere, scripture-based prayers, and laying our needs at the feet of a Lord who WILL provide. That’s what this story is about. No, it might not be tomorrow. And, no, it might not be next year. But God is not late. He has an enormous blessing for you, and I promise you, it will be RIGHT ON TIME.

You will keep in perfect peace those whose minds are steadfast, because they trust in you” (Isaiah 26:3).

“We are waiting for something we do not have yet, and we are waiting for it patiently” (Romans 8:25).

“Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint” (Isaiah 40:31).
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dear Lord, thank you so very much for all of the prayers you’ve answered for me. Thank you for all of the blessings you’ve given. I ask, Lord, that you help me to be patient and faithful during this season of waiting. I believe, God, that you ARE working and that although I can’t see the results just yet, they are coming. Help me, please, to keep my mind stayed on you so that I can rest in your peace while I await my answer from you. You are faithful, Lord. You are good, and I am so grateful for what all you’re doing in my life. You are my God, and because of that, I expect good things. In Jesus’s Name–Amen.

 

Author: lindseydt

Conway, Arkansas

5 thoughts on “Jehovah-jireh”

  1. Another job well done. Really good message. I think we all battle this. I’ve got a couple of things I’ve been praying for for 15+ years. Waiting on Him.

    Keep posting, we’ll keep reading

    Liked by 1 person

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